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Presentation and Discussion [clear filter]
Wednesday, November 1
 

8:30am

Grit: Bridging the Gap Between Faculty Expectations and Student Success
This workshop is designed to be highly interactive and to incorporate the reflections, observations, and collaboration of all participants. Attendees will share, both in small and large group discussion, their understandings of grit and how they see its presence (or lack thereof) in their students and classrooms. Their observations will be juxtaposed against the results of a study focusing not only on faculty perceptions of students, but those students perceptions of themselves. Participants will be asked to use this data and their own thoughts to determine what grit-fostering practices and pedagogies can be brought back to their classrooms and institutions.

Moderators
Speakers

Wednesday November 1, 2017 8:30am - 11:30am
Cambria East

8:30am

Game Design Principles for Peer Support Programs: A Primer ($ Ticketed Event) REGISTRATION REQUIRED
The morning session will incorporate a mix of brief lectures interspersed with case studies, Q & A, and hands-on exercises. The morning section will conclude with instructions for a working lunch where participants will use a template to be provided, to create a preliminary game design plan for their programs.
The afternoon session will be used to review the plans developed during lunch and will provide feedback on preliminary implementation plans. The institute will conclude with an overview of technology enabled and no-tech tools and strategies that can be used to support program designs developed during the institute.

Speakers


Wednesday November 1, 2017 8:30am - 4:00pm
Butler East
 
Thursday, November 2
 

10:15am

The Internet: A Game Changer - A Brain Changer
As developmental educators, we see students with weak educational backgrounds and poor study habits. Now, we may even have to work against the habits ingrained in them as they utilize the Internet. Join in the conversation about how technology is changing our brains.

During the roundtable Barb Zmolek will present information for a 30-minute time period, then pose questions to the participants, encourage discussion, and ask for comments from them about the information. I’m confident that we’ll begin building a bridge to span the gap between technology usage and deep information processing. I’m also confident that this bridge will be far from complete by the end of the session.

Moderators

Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Allegheny Grand II

10:15am

Engaging Readers in Critical Thinking and Cultural Literacy
The presenters will discuss the results of their research on engaging their students in critical thinking and cultural literacy in a developmental reading course and present students’ reader responses to culturally diverse texts. They will also engage the participants in sharing practices in promoting critical reading and cultural literacy.


The presenters will use PowerPoint in explaining the procedures that they followed in conducting their research on engaging readers in critical thinking and cultural literacy. They will present the results and conclusions. In addition, they will show sample students’ reading journal reports on their chosen culturally diverse texts. They will also engage the audience to ask questions and share their own practices to enhance their students’ critical reading and cultural literacy. The presenters will distribute handouts.

Moderators
Speakers


Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Westmoreland East

10:15am

Re-inventing Remedial Reading: A Reading Course Going Hybrid
Remedial courses have been the center of attention over the past decade. More students enter college and take at least one remedial course. Does this impact a student's identity? This presentation re-examines remedial reading in the 21st century and the implementation of a remedial reading hybrid course.

This presentation will provide faculty with results from student surveys in the hybrid reading course. Faculty will be provided with student's results and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of a hybrid reading course. We will also discuss how we can re-invent college reading to engage the learner in the 21st century.

Moderators
Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Butler West

10:15am

Building Bridges for Academic Texts: Students’ Experiences with PILLAR
This study investigated the application of a reading strategy device to explore underlying cognitive and metacognitive reading processes. Session participants will learn about the think-aloud procedures implemented to elicit students’ metacognitive processes as students attempted to make sense of larger concepts within biology and history textbook passages and findings.

This is a 60-minute presentation supplemented with a PowerPoint presentation highlighting the findings of the study. Participants will be able to ask questions and partake in discussion regarding possible implications and uses.

Speakers
SA

Sonya Armstrong

Texas State University
JL

Jodi Lampi

Northern Illinois University,Academic Literacy andLearning


Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Pennsylvania East

10:15am

Hook, Line and Sink "em - Improve Student Retention
A crucial issue that US colleges face today is retention. In this session, we will share insights about the practices we use at Principia College to support struggling learners. We will share how we track the progress and retention of our students using tools to support motivation, resilience, and persistence.

During this 60-minute session, you will learn how effective, engaging, and hands-on activities, such as EDpuzzle, GAFE, Socrative, Reminders, Chat Bots and more, can and do support students of all levels of academics. This session is designed for anyone wanting applicable and meaningful strategies. Audience participation is encouraged. This session is geared towards individuals who work with struggling students or are on academic probation, but all are invited to attend!

Moderators
Speakers


Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Armstrong

10:15am

IMTPC & ITTPC: Celebrating Successful Mentoring and Tutoring Programs!
Mentoring and tutoring programs that are research-based and strategically implemented can have a powerful impact on your learning program. Explore the Tutor and Mentor Training Program Certifications (ITTPC and IMTPC) of CRLA. Learn what is involved in developing these programs and the benefits and outcomes of tutoring and mentoring programs.

The presenter will share detailed information (verbal, Google Slides, and handouts) about the IMTPC and ITTPC certification programs and will encourage audience participation and questions throughout the hour-long concurrent session.

Moderators

Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Pennsylvania West

10:15am

Building Bridges between the CAS Standards and Program Evaluation
The Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS) recently approved the revised Learning Assistance Program (LAP) Standards which learning assistance programs may use for self-assessment and program evaluation. Participants will learn about these updated standards, about resources for program evaluation, and new CAS directions for assessment.


This session will have several formats:
(1) A Powerpoint presentation containing=:
(a) brief overview of CAS,
(b) description of the CAS LAP standards;
(c) information on how CRLA members can access the CAS LAP standards without cost;
(d) description of how the CAS LAP standards can guide program evaluation;
(e) description of new directions for LAP standards, particularly in using the new multi-standard framework.
(2) Audience participation and discussion focusing on the:
(a) analysis of the updated LAP standards,
(b) connection of the updated LAP standards to one’s own program.

Moderators

Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Washington

10:15am

A Streamlined Training Program for Supplemental Instruction Leaders
This session will provide a description of how the United States Naval Academy implements an effective, condensed training program to prepare their Supplemental Instruction leaders to facilitate peer-led sessions. The presenter will share the training sessions and resources that focus on self-regulated and collaborative learning techniques.

The presenter will include an overview of Kansas City’s Supplemental Instruction program and explain how our Supplemental Instruction benefits students. The session will also highlight the role of peer-leaders and the expectation in place for their performance. In detail, the presenter will outline and discuss the purpose behind the United States Naval Academy’s expedited Supplemental Instruction Program and their key training strategies covered. The final 15-20 minutes of the session will be open for questions and discussion of best practices for peer-led training programs.

Moderators
Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Allegheny Grand II

10:15am

Learning Assistance Experience and Teaching in Higher Education
LAP administrators believe their learning experience has significantly impacted their classroom teaching experiences and pedagogical abilities. This study suggests that LAP administrators are undervalued as a resource on campus, and that their teaching experiences should be valued more greatly.


The session will begin with presentation of research (20 min). Then the session will be interactive.

Moderators
JT

Jack Trammell

CRLA President

Speakers


Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Westmoreland Central

10:15am

Effective Practices of a CTE Embedded Tutoring Program
This presentation will detail the findings of the program evaluation of an embedded tutoring program supporting a career and technical education programs at a community college. 

This presentation will consist of an overview of an embedded tutoring program at a community college’s career and technical education campus with a focus on the conception of its current evaluation processes. Attendees will be encouraged to participate by responding to and asking relevant questions regarding the importance of an effective program evaluation at CTE colleges. Additionally, participants will engage in a discussion about possible evaluation designs for their institutions.

Moderators
Speakers

Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Westmoreland West

10:15am

The Senior Culminating Experience: A Vehicle For Collaboration and Community
This session will discuss the structure of the senior culminating experience as well as its literary themes, student preparation for research, writing and presentation, its role in fostering community and its role in students’ success after graduation.

We will present our findings via PPT and provide the audience with a handout outlining the benefits of implementing the senior culminating experience into a Capstone Course as well as the specific components of the senior culminating experience related to our department's Capstone Course.

Moderators
Speakers

Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Allegheny Grand II

1:45pm

Evaluating effectiveness and types of learning methods in the classroom
Learning methods and differentiated instruction continue to attract a lot of attention. Research shows some clear results related to the academic effectiveness of these different methods. Which methods can work? Which methods have worked for you? Is there more about these methods than simply obtaining higher academic scores?

For this roundtable there will be a 2-page handout with details on various research that has been completed in the area of learning styles and differentiated instruction. The handout will show where it has been proven to work and where there are areas of unknowns. The end will include a number of prompts to engage the participants during the discussion time.

Moderators

Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Allegheny Grand II

1:45pm

Bridging Literacy & Learning through Disciplinary Meaning Making Practices
This session highlights a case study inquiry into how undergraduates construct and enact literacy knowledge in disciplinary contexts. The researcher will present the study’s design, findings, and implications for practice and research. Participants will also discuss the potential of sociocultural perspectives in advancing our understanding and support of college literacy.

The presentation will consist of an overview of the research study, detailing the literature and theoretical framework, methods, and analytic procedures used in the inquiry. The presenter will then discuss the initial findings of the study, using student participants’ accounts to support the analysis and highlight their agency as disciplinary learners. Time will be given throughout the presentation for participant questions. The session will conclude with small group discussions about the nature of reading in disciplinary contexts, how educators can support students’ development of disciplinary literacy knowledge, and opportunities for further inquiry into understanding of college reading practices and outcomes.

Moderators
Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Lawrence

1:45pm

Reading Across the Disciplines: Expanding our Current Program
For this roundtable there will be a 2-page handout with details on various research that has been completed in the area of learning styles and differentiated instruction. The handout will show where it has been proven to work and where there are areas of unknowns. The end will include a number of prompts to engage the participants during the discussion time.

This presentation will begin with a PowerPoint presentation giving information about the program. Then, we will break into small groups to discuss current methods being used at different schools and best practices. Finally, we will have a large-group discussion about what was learned during the break out time.

Moderators
Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Allegheny Grand II

1:45pm

The Protégé Effect: Learning by Teaching in College Reading
Learning by teaching is not a new concept and is often considered one of the most effective ways to learn. This session includes a discussion on the idea of providing college reading students with the opportunity to become “teachers” in order to increase learning and overall academic success.

First, this session will provide a brief presentation that includes background information, theoretical framework and previous research that highlights the effectiveness of learning by teaching. Next, participants will get a glimpse into a College Reading class that requires students to teach content they are learning in their college courses to their peers – both in small and whole class settings. Sample teaching presentations and student reflections will be shared and discussed. Finally, time will be allotted for open discussion focusing on future ideas and feedback on utilizing a learning by teaching framework in a developmental reading course.

Moderators
Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Somerset West

1:45pm

I Read, I Write, I Think, I Create
This session provides an exchange of ideas on how technology can help students thread ideas and make connections as readers, writers, and critical thinkers. It introduces students’ websites that integrate reading, writing, metacognition and technology. These sites exemplify multifaceted literacy skills and demonstrate student growth and metacognitive awareness.

We will utilize a large group discussion with a power point presentation followed by small group discussion with questions and answers. Attendees will be encouraged to share expertise on ways they have used technology to enhance students’ reading and writing skills. In addition, attendees will consider ways their use of technology has influenced their own reading and writing skills. Handouts will be provided for further analysis of the issues presented.

Moderators
Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Cambria West

1:45pm

Identifying and supporting students with learning disabilitiesin IRW programs
This presentation examines the current state of students with disclosed and non-disclosed learning disabilities and differences and the effect of these maladies on the successful completion of IRW courses. The discussion will include strategies to identify students with learning disabilities and ways of creating bridges for their academic success.

PowerPoints, handouts and large group discussions of remediation practices currently in place will be used. There will be opportunity for questions and comments. The presenter will also draw on classroom experiences, background with special needs students, and data related to student placement furnished from Academic Advising and Placement.

Moderators

Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Westmoreland West

1:45pm

Disciplinary Literacy as a Bridge to Success in Mathematics
This session provides information about the nature of reading in mathematics and strategies math faculty and tutors can use to help students improve their disciplinary literacy skills. It includes information on math-specific literacy skills and classroom practices that support and scaffold students’ comprehension.

This presentation will consist of 8 - 15 minutes of an introduction on the research from the field of disciplinary literacy. The next 30 to 40 minutes will involve participants in text analysis and discussions, and will allow them to experience active learning reading strategies that can be used in a mathematics classroom. Some of the strategies will include the use of graphic organizers, anticipation guides, and discussion groups. The presenters will provide examples of actual math text and explore the ways a student interacts with that text. The last 5- 10 minutes will be used for reflections and questions.

Moderators
Speakers


Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Westmoreland Central

1:45pm

Becoming an ITTPC reviewer
This informal session is for anyone curious about becoming an ITTPC reviewer. The ITTPC Coordinator and current reviewers will explain the review process, the requirements of becoming a reviewer and the benefits of joining the reviewer team. There will be opportunities for questions, suggestions and feedback from the session participants.


This will be an informal session. Current reviewers will discuss the benefits of becoming a reviewer, the requirements and time commitment involved in the process. We will demonstrate an online training module and answer questions that potential reviewers may have.

Moderators
Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Fayette

1:45pm

Developing Strategic, Individualized, and Data-Informed Networks of Support
We will share a data-informed framework of student success by highlighting a collaborative and effectively intrusive network of support established between our First-Year Advising and Academic Achievement Centers. This nexus provides critical guidance and support to academically vulnerable students with strategically targeted and structured opportunities for holistic student development.

The Dean of Advising & First Year Programs, and Director of the Academic Achievement Center will interactively discuss the 1) evolution of advising and academic supports at the institution, 2) formulation of a strategically structured, individualized, and targeted network of support, and 3) share data from 5 cohorts of participants in a concentrated academic support plan. The topic will be presented for approximately 40 minutes (participants will be encouraged to engage and ask questions throughout), with the last 20 minutes set aside for an interactive discussion of best practices and practical applications for data/research-driven learning assistance programming.

Moderators
Speakers


Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Armstrong

1:45pm

Outcome-Based Assessments: Bridging Academic Skills and Career Readiness
Using outcomes-based assessment to evaluate general education literacies and professional skills helps college students understand the relationship between assignments and career skills. This roundtable will discuss the value of outcome based assessment at the institutional and program level as well as the benefits for students and faculty.

Participants will provide an overview of using General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies, followed by a participant driven discussion focusing on designing outcomes, creating effective rubrics, and building student portfolios that will make students more competitive in the job market. Sample rubrics will be shared with the group, along with examples of outcomes for various courses.


Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Allegheny Grand II

1:45pm

Results of a State-wide Quasi-experiment on Accelerated Reading & Writing
This project evaluated pedagogical outcomes of a state-mandated curricular shift to Integrated Reading and Writing coursework in Texas. Asking the question, “Does IRW work better than stand-alone reading and stand-alone writing?” this session presents the results of research on the efficacy of IRW courses across all Texas community college districts.

We will use a PPT as a visual aid but will focus on engaging the audience through rich description of the study, its outcomes, its impact, and links to the classroom. A handout will be provided for attendees. Two graduate students involved in this project will be a part of the presentation team.


Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Pennsylvania West

3:00pm

Bridging Developmental Reading, Writing and Critical Thinking Using Thematic Units
Integrating reading, writing, and critical thinking equally can be challenging. Thematic units provide the platform to support all three crucial areas equally. This panel will demonstrate the planning of engaging thematic units using backwards design, share classroom-tested units, and describe strategies for experiences in reading, writing, and critical thinking.

The presentation content will be delivered though PowerPoint, interactive classroom case studies, and small and large group discussion. The chair will begin with an overview of backwards design and components of effective thematic units. Using this framework, three panelists will demonstrate how they translate this research/theory into practice using sample lessons and student work. The chair will then facilitate an interactive discussion in which participants will share ideas for adopting thematic units in their respective classrooms. This will also be an opportunity for dialogue between the panelists and presenters.



Thursday November 2, 2017 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Pennsylvania East

3:00pm

First Year in a Learning Center: Navigation, Support, and Guidance
Have you transitioned into a learning assistance center in an entry, mid-level, or director position and questioned how to thrive in the role? Personal experiences, survey results, and theoretical frameworks will guide this interactive session; participants will discover best practices for being effective in their first year.

The presenters will be using a slideshow presentation as the primary visual aid throughout the workshop. Audience engagement will be implemented through a variety of methods, including an interactive survey which participants will respond to during the workshop to spark conversation and gather various experiences and perspectives. Additionally, participants will be divided into small groups to discuss obstacles they have witnessed or experienced. The large group will then have a discussion about solutions and strategies for facilitating an impactful and smooth first-year transition into a learning assistance center.

View Presentation File via Google Drive Here


Thursday November 2, 2017 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Butler East

3:00pm

Enhancing Self-Directed Learning in SI Leaders
The presenter will give an overview of the training format and priorities of an established SI program, highlighting several best practices for fostering self-directed learning in leaders. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss and share best practices from their programs for encouraging critical engagement in the self-directed learning process.

The Supplemental Instruction and EXCEL Collaborative Learning Group Program Coordinator will give an overview of one university’s undergraduate collaborative learning programs, featuring the training format and priorities and highlighting several of the program’s best practices for fostering self-directed learning in leaders.

Participants will have the opportunity to discuss and share their best practices for encouraging self-assessment, collaborative learning technique mastery, critical engagement, reflection, and creativity for fostering self-directed learning in student leaders and their sessions.

Speakers

Thursday November 2, 2017 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Somerset West
 
Friday, November 3
 

9:45am

Missions and Toolkits: A Study of Reading in Writing Centers
This Research Report shares data and analysis from a multi-site, mixed-methods study of reading pedagogy in writing centers. Through a national survey, interviews, and observations this study explores 1) the extent to which writing centers embrace reading instruction and 2) the range of strategies currently in use for reading instruction.

The researcher will 1) summarize relevant background, theory, and pedagogy in order to help the audience understand motives behind the study, 2) quickly trace the research methodology, 3) share qualitative and quantitative data, 3) invite audience members to pose questions, and 4) facilitate a collective discussion of survey results, significance, and applications.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Westmoreland East

9:45am

Investigating Students’ Attitudes in an Emporium-Designed Developmental Math Course
This presentation explores students’ pre- and post-attitudes towards an Emporium-designed developmental math course; the relationship between students’ attitudes and performance; and the effect of gender on performance and attitude. Results indicate a significant difference in some elements of attitude. However, there is no significant relationship between post-attitude and performance.

The delivery method will be a power-point presentation. The presenter will distribute handouts to the session attendees. The researcher will encourage the conference attendees to reflect on their instructional practices, especially using Emporium model and exchange valuable information about how positive attitudes may benefit better learning outcome.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Somerset West

9:45am

Using Co-requisite Math Courses As Accelerated On-ramps
After years of developmental education redesign, one community college utilized institutional data, research, and pedagogical teaching and learning experiences to create a unique “on ramp” opportunity for under-prepared students. Come learn how this innovative curricular design including co-requisites, cohorts, contextualization, and embedded tutors has led to greater student success.

This presentation will use video, PowerPoint, and handouts to engage participants in understanding the inner workings of our program. Institutional data used to drive curricular decisions, developmental redesign models and results data, new program components and design, pragmatic classroom tools, and new program results data will be shared. The audience will be engaged during a question and answer portion at the end of the presentation.

Moderators
Speakers


Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Butler West

9:45am

Campus Climate and its Impact on Student Engagement
This presentation provides participants with preliminary data on how derogatory rhetoric following the 2016 presidential election impacted a university in the Southwest. The discussion portion of our roundtable invites attendees to examine the climate of their institutions and how leaders of postsecondary institutions can foster inclusive diversity.

In the first 30 minutes of the roundtable discussion, the presenters will provide a brief presentation to showcase our review of literature, methodology, and findings. They will also provide attendees with qualitative data, such as student responses and artifacts we collected from our preliminary research. Implications and conclusions will be presented for attendees. The discussion portion of our roundtable presentation invites attendees to examine the current cultural climate of their institutions and how we, as leaders of postsecondary institutions, can incorporate politics, diversity, and culture into the classroom in a positive way.


Moderators
Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Allegheny Grand II

9:45am

Developing Professionals: A Study of Tutoring as a Transferrable Skill
This presentation describes the distinct and lasting benefit of working in a community college learning center through presenting findings from a qualitative study exploring the impact of working as a tutor on professionals who were formerly tutors.

For this presentation, we will first explain the study and the findings, which will include former tutors’ recommendations for how supervisors can best support tutors’ development into professionals. Next, the audience will have the opportunity to discuss the methods by which they, as supervisors, can best support their tutors as they transition to professional roles. Additionally, the presenters will discuss the implications of the focus on transition to professional positions including recruitment, retention, and training.

Moderators
Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Cambria West

9:45am

Welcome to the future: Navigating the new, online IMTPC process!
This informal session is intended as an introduction to the new online application for the CRLA’s International Mentor Training Program Certification (IMTPC). Participants will learn about new IMTPC requirements, interact with the new system, and discuss ways to transition their existing certification materials to the online process.

The focus of the session will be on the new online application system and how participants can navigate the new requirements and format. As the round-table format inherently invites lively discussion, the IMTPC Coordinator and Assistant Coordinator will foster participant dialogue surrounding the reasons for modernizing the IMTPC process for better accessibility, convenience, and utility. The facilitators will then present an overview of the new online system, highlighting new features such as saving work in progress, direct upload of documents, and structured response prompts for greater user-utility.

Moderators
Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Allegheny Grand II

9:45am

Bridging Innovative Qualitative Inquiry with Digital Data Management and Analysis
Computer-assisted qualitative data analysis software (CAQDAS) offers effective digital platforms for managing and analyzing data. However, technology is only as good as the inquiries asked of it. Presenters will discuss research question and design considerations to inform appropriate use of software to bridge development of innovative and efficient research methods.

The session will begin with a presentation of foundational information to support initial understandings of CAQDAS. In tandem with the presentation of the basics, presenters will provide examples (screenshots and modeling of functions) of current projects to clarify concepts. Once the basic functionality has been demonstrated, the session will shift to a discussion of the importance of research question and design alignment for use of CAQDAS. Finally, time will be allotted for work in partners or groups to craft research questions followed by whole group discussions of how CAQDAS can facilitate answers to those questions.

Moderators
Speakers
JL

Jodi Lampi

Northern Illinois University,Academic Literacy andLearning


Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Fayette

9:45am

College Students with Mental Illness and the Developmental Education Community
This session addresses how college students with mental illness are part of the DE community. Little research explores mental illness in students despite the rising number reporting mental health concerns. Come learn about mental illness in academia and why we should broaden our conception of DE to include this population.

Current data about college student mental illness will be disseminated alongside the literature about this population. DE theory will be discussed to bridge the gap between DE and college students with mental illness. Afterwards, the floor will be opened for discussion of why these students belong as part of the DE community as well as participant experience in working with college students with mental illness to facilitate dialogue about how reconceptualizing DE in this way requires attention to the supports we can provide college students with mental illness

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Westmoreland West

9:45am

What GPAs Don't Say: Qualitative Evaluation of Supplemental Instruction
When assessing Supplemental Instruction, it's common practice to use GPA as an indicator of efficacy. This presentation discusses how quantitative GPA analysis gives a skewed representation of effectiveness and how qualitative survey analysis can provide a much clearer and accurate picture of how well a program is working.

This session will be presented lecture style with room for questions and answer throughout and at the end.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Allegheny Grand II

11:00am

Using ACTOR to Enhance Efficient Reading
The presenters will discuss the procedures and results of their research on using ACTOR in teaching developmental reading. They will engage the participants as they demonstrate this method that is intended to help students to become better readers. Participants will be invited to reflect on the use of ACTOR.

The presenters will use PowerPoint in demonstrating the steps with accompanying strategies in ACTOR. They will also explain procedures that they followed in conducting their research on the use of ACTOR. They will present the results of the study and conclusions. In addition, they will show sample students’ responses to the open ended questions that were included in the survey. They will also engage the audience to ask questions and explore the possibility of using ACTOR in teaching reading across educational levels. The presenters will distribute handouts that detail the steps and strategies and sample activities in ACTOR.

Moderators
Speakers


Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Washington

11:00am

Using Multiple Texts to Teach Critical Reading Skills
Mastery of developmental reading courses offers both an opportunity for academic enrichment and a barrier to college completion. The use of mutiple texts as oppose to the one size-fits-all approach may not be an effective pedagogical practice by instructors who teach the LD student.

The presentation will be introduced using a PowerPoint presentation of the research. It will highlight key findings and integrate a hands-on activity for audience participation, followed by a closing discussion on the use of multiple texts.

Moderators
Speakers


Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Allegheny Grand II

11:00am

Building a Bridge for Technical Programs: Writing for the Professions
“Writing for the Professions” is a course for technical-program students that contextualizes writing toward career-based genres. It is an English Composition I alternative for A.A.S./Certificate Degree students that fosters success by bridging the gap between academic and real-world writing. Topics include course description, learning objectives, and comparison with English Composition.

The roundtable delivery method of a 30-minute presentation followed by a 30-minute focused small-group discussion is perfect for our topic. We expect our innovative Writing for the Professions course with contextualized career-based writing for technical-program students (in lieu of English Composition I) to excite participants and generate much fruitful discussion

Moderators
Speakers


Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Allegheny Grand II

11:00am

Course Design Principles for Integrating Reading into Writing Programs
This session will focus on research-based principles for integrating reading strategies into all levels of a writing program. Attendees will explore effective teaching practices for designing courses, writing assignments, and related learning activities that help students strengthen critical reading skills and make a successful transition to college-level source-based writing.

The session will be organized into four sections: 1) a short introduction to research-based principles for integrating reading into writing courses, 2) an overview of an award-winning model writing program curriculum that incorporates reading instruction and writing about reading into each level of a college writing program from developmental education to sophomore writing, 3) examples of reading-based writing assignments and related learning activities at each course level in a writing program, and 4) a facilitated discussion with attendees about strategies for applying concepts from the presentation to participants’ own courses and programs.

Moderators
Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Somerset West

11:00am

Working with Faculty to Create an Effective Math Lab
The previous structure of the math lab ignored faculty needs and expectations, but through communication with the Mathematics Department, the math lab created a structure that would be beneficial to both faculty and students.

The session will be delivered by a slide presentation including testimonials from faculty, staff, students, and tutors and will offer a variety of ideas and challenges faced during the development and implementation process of the new structure. Before beginning the presentation, they presenters will ask the participants to fill out a brief survey pertaining to topics discussed throughout the presentation. On the survey, they will also have the participants list possible challenges or successes they might currently be facing. The goal is to answer those possible challenges and comment on successful practices in the presentation and discussion with other participants.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Armstrong

11:00am

Discussion on Treasurer's Duties for SRC Current and Future Leaders
This is an opportunity to network and learn from current and past treasurer's of CRLA. Regional and State treasurers, both current, past, and possible future members who are interested in discussing budget management, reports, availability of funds, and general tips on managing records will be discussed.


Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Crawford East

11:00am

Embedded Learning Assistance: A Viable Alternative to Traditional SI
An Embedded Learning Assistance program was piloted from Fall 2014—Fall 2016 to support a high-risk, 100-level Practical Statistics course with a historical failure rate of 25%. As a result of this program, failure rates dropped to a record low of 10% and students were more engaged during class.

This session will be delivered through an interactive PowerPoint presentation and discussion, and supported with informational and practical handouts for participants. The informational handout will briefly summarize key facets of the Embedded Learning Assistance program described in the present study. The practical handout will prompt participants to reflect on high-risk courses at their own institutions, and to consider what resources they would require to implement a similar program. There will also be time for interactive discussion of the results, study implications and limitations, and implementation suggestions.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Westmoreland West

11:00am

Celebrating the Legacy of CRLA Through Oral History
This presentation presents the first oral histories in the CRLA Oral History Project that preserve the professional knowledge and unique understandings-insights developed by a generation of reading professionals who are reaching or have reached retirement age after serving in the field and our association across the past 40 years.

The content of the 60 minute research report will be delivered through symposium format and supplemented with posters highlighting the findings of each of the four oral histories. The posters will then be placed out in the registration area for review by conference attendees across the duration of the conference.  Individuals will be recruited to serve as oral historians for future endeavors.


Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Westmoreland Central

11:00am

College Literacy and Learning SIG-ILA: teaching, service and scholarship
This session provides an opportunity for literacy conversations and available resources for those involved with college students’ literacy and learning programs. Members from the College Literacy & Learning Special Interest Group of the International Literacy Association will discuss teaching, scholarship, and service projects for professional development.

Small group discussion will include a variety of topics including the dichotomy of content area literacy versus disciplinary literacy (Shanahan & Shanahan, 2012), innovative teaching practices, the effectiveness of critical literacy, and other concerns and issues presented within individual programs and classrooms. Lastly, opportunities for professional development including service and scholarship will be followed by questions.

Moderators
Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Lawrence

11:00am

Growing the Academic Coaching Research Base: Findings from Two Studies
Academic coaching is a form of academic support quickly gaining prominence, yet the empirical research base for assessing its effectiveness remains relatively small. To help bridge the gap between research and practice, this session will present findings from two major studies into academic coaching.

The research report will be conducted primarily in the format of a digital presentation with an emphasis on data visualization through charts and graphs. A brief research summary in hard copy format will also be distributed to session attendees. All attendees will be encouraged to ask questions as well as share experiences and ideas.

Moderators
Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Pennsylvania East

11:00am

CRLA and N4A: Bridging Two Organizations
The National Association of Academic Advisors for Athletics (N4A) provides professional development opportunities within the Student Athlete Academic Support Services field. For members, specifically of the Learning Concerns and Enhancement Committee, collaboration with CRLA could prove very beneficial. This facilitated discussion is designed to explore partnership opportunities within the organizations.

This presentation will follow the roundtable format. There will be a 30-minute presentation that will provided an overview of N4A LCEC Committee and the CRLA Student Athlete Special Interest Group. This will be followed by round table discussion. The audience will be engaged by interacting with other participants by answering a series of questions aimed at brainstorming ways to create meaningful programmatic efforts from both organizations. These efforts are aimed at creating valuable professional development opportunities for members of both organizations

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Allegheny Grand II

11:00am

Lessons learned while writing my eText
Providing current instructional resources for students, especially in technology-based courses challenges instructors to keep pace with Moore’s Law; it is like balancing an elephant on a razor blade.

Whether it is a report, a presentation, a newsletter, a personal story, a photo album, or a visual trip report, there is virtually no limit on what you can express creatively with Sway. If you are building a presentation dependent on imagery including a lot of online content or if your audience will be guiding themselves through the presentation, Sway is probably going to work better for you.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Allegheny Grand II

2:00pm

Using Young Adult Literature in the Developmental Writing Classroom
Using young adult (YA) literature in a developmental classroom helps our students better respond to readings and supports the learning goals in most developmental writing classrooms. YA books also help connect students to our writing assignments and their writing goals, while giving them relatable and accessible readings.

The presentation will be delivered with a research presentation with audience feedback and some technology integration.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Washington

2:00pm

Maximizing Center Resources with TutorTrac Software
Accurate maintenance of learning center data is critical in today’s “technologically aware” campus. Successful service to students is required as more campuses compete for students. Students want access to their information and the ability to make appointments easily.

Our presentation will include an interactive demonstration of TutorTrac software.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Crawford East

2:00pm

Bridging the Gap Between Math Tutoring and Learning Practices
A research project was conducted in a math tutoring center. Data was collected and this data was compared to variables that positively affect student learning. Results from this study will be shared with implications for how tutoring centers can work more effectively with college math departments.

The presentation will begin with audience participation. Learning and variables that affect learning will be discussed. The presenter will discuss the variables to be studied. The audience will be asked to reflect on the variables studied. Participants will be encouraged to reflect on variables they believe have the greatest impact on leaning. The data collected and implications will be shared. There will be a discussion on how to create bridges between math departments and tutoring centers. The presenter will also share how the data was used at the College of Southern Nevada to create bridges to the math department.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Allegheny Grand II

2:00pm

Peer tutoring: The bridge between knowledge banking and self-directed learning
As students enter college they are caught between the familiar -- teachers giving them information-- and the new --their need to learn independently. Peer tutoring bridges the gap between education banking and self-directed learning by introducing a facilitator in the self-directed learning process.

The delivery method for this session will consist of a half hour presentation discussing Knowles theory of self-directed learning, self-directed learning versus teacher-centered learning, and the results of my research. The second half of the session will be a discussion on how to start actively using self-directed learning as a tutoring technique and the different ways this can be enacted and how to train the peer tutors. We will also discuss what people are already doing to promote self-directed learning as part of the tutoring process.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Lawrence

2:00pm

Empowering Women to Increase Competence in STEM through Summer Bridge
The Academic Learners and Leaders Initiative (A.L.L.I.), offers students a smoother transition to college by immersing them in math and science while mixing in opportunities to forge those all-important early college relationships with faculty, staff, and peers. This presentation will explore the A.L.L.I. model and highlight benefits for first-year students.

This presentation will utilize PowerPoint slides with interactive content. Audience participation and discussion will be encouraged throughout the presentation. Participation will be prompted by discussion questions posted in slides throughout the presentation.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Butler East

2:00pm

How Allies Can Build Bridges for LGBTQIA Students
This interactive session focuses on an ongoing study examining the experiences of Developmental Education faculty who are allies to students who identify as LGBTQIA. Participants will collaborate with peers to navigate building bridges for students who identify as LGBTQIA and leave with resources to take back to their institutions.

The presentation will be an informed conversation. We will begin with an overview of the ongoing pilot study, showcasing the context, instrumentation, participants, and rationale. After discussing data from the pilot study, a whole group discussion about the generalizability of the results, as well as implications for practice, will be facilitated. Additional resources will be given to session attendees.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Westmoreland East

2:00pm

Establishing a Successful Walk-in Tutoring Progam in Residence Halls/University Libraries
Carnegie Mellon University's Academic Development has managed to establish a successful walk-in tutoring program in three residence halls and two libraries on campus. Highly motivated and trained undergraduate Peer Tutors staff these sessions. This presentation will highlight the most successful elements of the program.

The Peer Tutor Program Coordinator will give a presentation on the history and development of Academic Development’s walk-in tutoring program with the aim of providing a model for other tutoring centers to follow. This will be proceeded by a panel discussion and q&a session between attendees and a group of Peer Tutors who help staff Academic Development’s walk-in tutoring service.

Moderators

Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Fayette

2:00pm

Retirement: The Bridge to Elderhood
As we move into retirement we are asked many questions about what we are going to do with the rest of our lives. In this discussion hopefully we can open our hearts and minds to changing the paradigm to becoming the Elder Sages that is our destiny.

This will be an open discussion with examples provided to stimulate thought and participation. Many examples will be provided in the handouts to help members get the message of elderhood loud and clear. The presenter has many years of experience at encouraging audience participation.

Moderators

Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Somerset West

2:00pm

Bridging Experience to Facilitate Better Teaching: An IRW Mentoring Model
This session addresses a mentoring model developed for new IRW instructors. Research on mentees’ perceptions of the model will be presented alongside the structure of the model to give an idea of the model’s efficacy and how it was built.

The mentoring model will be described as well as the basis for its inception. Then, the research on mentees’ experiences will be explored, giving a picture of their perception of the model and its efficacy in assisting new IRW instructors. Audience members will be invited to share how IRW mentoring is implemented at their institutions and consider how our model might be adapted to suit their needs.


Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Pennsylvania East

2:00pm

Disciplinary Literacy: How do Experts and Novices Approach Literary Text
This study examined the discipline-specific strategies that experts and novices use to read and comprehend literary texts. Findings indicate differences between literary experts and student novices and unique differences between the strategies developmental and non-developmental students employ to read literary texts. These differences have pedagogical implications for DE literacy classes.

Research data will be presented and implications for practice will be discussed. This session will use discussion and question/answer activities to present to and to engage the audience. Thus, we will use our research data as a starting point for a larger group discussion on what it means for the field and for our classroom practices.

Moderators
JL

Jodi Lampi

Northern Illinois University,Academic Literacy andLearning

Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Pennsylvania West

3:15pm

Assessing Job Skills and Helping Students Build a Portfolio
Utilizing clearly established Professional Competencies and General Education Literacy standards can create a cohesive student experience across a degree program. Aligning assignments with specific competencies can help students prepare for their chosen career field and develop a portfolio for practical use post graduation.

The four presenters will each share their own connection with the program and development of PCs and GELs. Presenters will discuss research and best practices. The audience will be able to ask questions and join in the discussion. Audience members will also be asked to consider how points from the presentation might align with their own institution.



Friday November 3, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Cambria East

3:15pm

Bridging the Divide: Academic Support Across Student Populations
This presentation explores our journey in coordinating academic support services across traditional, adult, and graduate student populations. We offer recommendations for transcending barriers to student success and promoting inclusive opportunities for learning support and increased access to academic resources.

Through narrative, we will share how our level of engagement in our higher education affected our success and shapes our administrative approach to academic support. We will then ground our conversation in the mission and values of our institution, followed by an exploration of the trends in higher education in providing academic support for various student populations in the midst of budget and personnel constraints. Finally, we will share how we practically combine our services and address barriers in the process. We will then engage the audience in dialogue regarding their challenges in coordinating support services for different student populations.

Moderators
Speakers


Friday November 3, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Westmoreland East

3:15pm

No Typical Job: The Impact of Tutoring on the Tutor
Numbers and data speak! Come learn how tutoring positively effects the tutor, which can be used to justify your center’s work and more financial support from administration. Studies in the field only address the effects on the tutee, but understanding the impact on the tutor can help in numerous ways.

The presenter for this session will begin with the limited research available on the impact of tutoring (and tutor training) on the peer tutor. Using real data from a survey she created and distributed to current/former tutors across the U.S., this presenter will then address ways in which tutoring positively affects the peer tutor and thus, retention, graduation and employment rates for these students. The session will then devote time to videos of tutors’ testimonies about the impact tutoring had on them both currently and for their future goals. It will conclude with a discussion about attendees’ experiences.

Moderators

Friday November 3, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Butler West

3:15pm

Regression Analysis of Remedial Mathematics Students’ Success
The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of redesigned remedial coursework model on the student achievement rate of students enrolled in the gatekeeper mathematics course, between Academic Year (AY) 2012 - AY 2013, to attain an associate degree at the Technical College System of Georgia.

PowerPoint presentation will describe the motivation, objectives, methodology, results, summarization of findings, limitations, and recommendations of the study. The presenter will end the presentation by asking if the participants had any questions pertaining to the study and will then open up the discussion forum after all the questions have been answered.



Friday November 3, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Butler East

3:15pm

Metaphors and Storytelling in tutoring Pacific Island Students
Surveys with Pacific Island students suggest that certain pedagogical practices patterned after the US educational system are often incongruent with indigenous approaches to teaching and learning. Taking a comparative view of their US and Asian counterparts, this study focuses on the best practices for tutoring English to Pacific Islanders.

This presentation will be delivered through a powerpoint presentation and visual slides, videos, and discussion.

Moderators
Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Armstrong

3:15pm

Building Bridges with Parents: Institutional Strategies for Student Success
Universities struggle with the extent to which parents should be involved in the college experience. While research suggests parents should back off, it also shows that students can be more successful with parental support. This session examines strategies allowing effective parental support, from a healthy distance.

This interactive presentation provides participants with a background in research on parental involvement in higher education. Participants will reflect on their current campus climate and parent interactions. Presenters address issues to consider in creating parent support opportunities, framing the discussion around the stakeholders: the student, the parent, and the institution. Participants will share their parent communication challenges and approaches, and their ideas for moving forward. Presenters will provide participants with potential resources that institutions can share with parents to eliminate mixed messages, help parents strike a balance between hovering and letting go, and contribute to student success.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Pennsylvania East
 
Saturday, November 4
 

8:00am

Using texts that address contemporary issues in college writing courses
Texts that examine contemporary issues provide a backdrop for students to develop their writing skills beyond process and grammar. This session examines how texts in a first year writing course strengthened students’ writing and established a context for writing experiences. Findings suggest students’ writing, class participation, and faculty-student relationships improved.

This will be a short presentation followed by a discussion, using PowePoint and a projector. The audience will have an opportunity to examine the assessment results associated with the FYC courses, the survey instruments, and a sample of a reading used in the courses.

Moderators
Saturday November 4, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Armstrong

8:00am

Process Improvement: Process Mapping Your Learning Center's Work Flow
Academic Development has used student needs as the basis for programmatic innovation across all components. Through the introduction of a robust Academic Coaching, Peer Tutoring, and Supplemental Instruction/EXCEL Collaborative Learning Group Program, we have been building academic bridges for students for twenty years.

The presenters will give an overview of the journey Academic Development has traveled over the past twenty years, highlighting innovations in each of the programs in a panel format. The audience will have the opportunity to ask questions of the panelists, which will include student employees who work within each component as well as the department director and program coordinators.


Saturday November 4, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Somerset West

8:00am

Writing Tutor Training: A 1-Credit Course Model
As part of employee training, our Writing Consultants take a 1-credit Writing Consultant Training course, which was developed through collaboration between our Center and the English department. This presentation will discuss the course, its inception, and its impact on our writing tutors.

The session will be presented using PowerPoint or Google Slides. It will encourage discussion and feedback throughout the session and especially at the end.   

Moderators
Saturday November 4, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Lawrence

8:00am

Assessment of peer tutoring and mentoring on students' success
The Center for Learning Excellence (CLE) at AlAkhawayn University had a strategic impact on the increase of success and excellence at the level of freshmen courses in the department of science and engineering. We proved with 95% confidence that our services had a direct impact on students' grades.

We will use visual aid (power point presentation) and include clearly the numbers and graphs needed to fully understand the objectives of the presentation.
Handouts will also be distributed to facilitate the understanding of the statistical approach used. The audience will be engaged by starting with an Ice Breaking activity and questions to have the audiences' input

Moderators
Speakers

Saturday November 4, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Pennsylvania East

8:00am

Building Bridges, Removing Barriers: Supporting Students with Disabilities
This panel will address issues of understanding diversity and leveraging student differences to maximize success for students with disabilities. Key points will focus on faculty-student connections as well as an in-depth examination of disabilities. Audience members will be actively engaged in this dynamic conversation about working with students with disabilities.




Saturday November 4, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Butler East