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Tuesday, October 31
 

5:00pm

Registration
Tuesday October 31, 2017 5:00pm - 9:00pm
Allegheny Foyer

8:30pm

Hospitality Room
Tuesday October 31, 2017 8:30pm - 10:30pm
Washington
 
Wednesday, November 1
 

7:30am

Session Chairs' Orientation
Session Chairs introduce presenters and distribute and collect evaluation forms from session attendees. Session Chair Orientation is held each morning for assignments. Benefits include a guaranteed seat at the session you're chairing and an opportunity to serve the association while getting to know the presenters and CRLA colleagues.

Wednesday November 1, 2017 7:30am - 8:00am
Lawrence

7:30am

Registration
Wednesday November 1, 2017 7:30am - 7:30pm
Allegheny Foyer

8:30am

Teaching IRW in Non-traditional Settings with Non-traditional Students
Primarily used for developmental students, IRW is beneficial across all levels of post-secondary instruction. This workshop focuses on IRW instruction beyond the traditional contexts. The presenter will share models including mainstreaming devleopmental students in redesigned composition courses, teaching IRW online, and redesigning upper-level writing courses to reflect an IRW approach.

Speakers

Wednesday November 1, 2017 8:30am - 11:30am
Westmoreland Central

8:30am

Like a Bridge Over Troubled Waters: Developing a Workshop Program
An ever-evolving workshop program can be a tool that promotes student success to your largest audiences and help promote all services in your center. In this interactive session, we’ll discuss types of workshops, content, delivery methods, tools, marketing and assessment. Participants will create their own workshop program and share materials.

Moderators
Wednesday November 1, 2017 8:30am - 11:30am
Westmoreland East

8:30am

Designing a campus-specific community-sourced encyclopedia of learning strategies
This interactive session will provide an overview of our project including lessons learned since its initial development, the current state of the project and future directions. Participants will work through a design process to adapt the platform and concept to their own institutional contexts. Specifically, participants will break into groups based on which campus constituencies they imagine contributing to a “local-pedia” at their institution, individually and collectively brainstorm responses to key design prompts, and share insights among the groups. We will share a free WordPress plug-in we have created that will streamline the development of projects on participants’ campuses.



Wednesday November 1, 2017 8:30am - 11:30am
Cambria West

8:30am

International Tutor Training Program Certification, Part I “Getting the Basics”
This is an interactive, hands- on session. Presenters will use a Power Point, the CRLA website and the online ITTPC Level 1 certification application to demonstrate and explain the Level 1 certification process. Participants will have ample opportunity to ask questions. They will work in large and small groups to explore their individual readiness for certification and complete worksheets that help them identify and elaborate on ITTPC training topics and delivery methodologies. There will be many opportunities for sharing ideas, best practices, and individual attention from the presenters.


Wednesday November 1, 2017 8:30am - 11:30am
Westmoreland Central

8:30am

Grit: Bridging the Gap Between Faculty Expectations and Student Success
This workshop is designed to be highly interactive and to incorporate the reflections, observations, and collaboration of all participants. Attendees will share, both in small and large group discussion, their understandings of grit and how they see its presence (or lack thereof) in their students and classrooms. Their observations will be juxtaposed against the results of a study focusing not only on faculty perceptions of students, but those students perceptions of themselves. Participants will be asked to use this data and their own thoughts to determine what grit-fostering practices and pedagogies can be brought back to their classrooms and institutions.

Moderators
Speakers

Wednesday November 1, 2017 8:30am - 11:30am
Cambria East

8:30am

Game Design Principles for Peer Support Programs: A Primer ($ Ticketed Event) REGISTRATION REQUIRED
The morning session will incorporate a mix of brief lectures interspersed with case studies, Q & A, and hands-on exercises. The morning section will conclude with instructions for a working lunch where participants will use a template to be provided, to create a preliminary game design plan for their programs.
The afternoon session will be used to review the plans developed during lunch and will provide feedback on preliminary implementation plans. The institute will conclude with an overview of technology enabled and no-tech tools and strategies that can be used to support program designs developed during the institute.

Speakers


Wednesday November 1, 2017 8:30am - 4:00pm
Butler East

1:00pm

Building Bridges Between the Learning Assistance Center and Major Stakeholders
This Institute will be divided among three topics areas. Presenters from different institutions will contribute during each topic area. During each of the three focus areas, there will be an interactivity activity (i.e. small group breakouts, workshopping, etc.) in order to ensure a high level of engagement.

The first portion will focus on effective strategies for building bridges between a learning assistance center and students’ classroom experience. The second section will focus on successfully building bridges between a learning assistance center and Faculty. The final segment will focus on connecting a learning assistance center to the institution as a whole



Wednesday November 1, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Cambria West

1:00pm

International Mentor Training Program Certification (IMTPC): Developing/Expanding Your Mentor Program
This institute is intended for college and university professionals who are developing or enhancing a peer mentor training program, and applying for IMTPC Certification. Participants will engage in discussion about certification requirements, share best practices, and complete components of the IMTPC application process.

The main portion of the workshop will consist of engaging activities to allow the participants to begin planning their mentor training programs and to continue or begin working on their IMTPC applications. Participants without existing programs will be guided through activities designed to build mentor training programs from the ground up. Participants with programs that are currently in existence will engage in program assessment and evaluation activities in order to determine if changes should be made. Participants will share their progress with the group as well as their paths forward. The institute will conclude with a question and answer period.

Moderators
Wednesday November 1, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Fayette

1:00pm

International Tutor Training Program Certification, Part II "Beyond the Basics"
Through a PowerPoint presentation and discussion by experienced reviewers, participants will have an opportunity to learn about advanced tutor training program certification. We will be sharing experiences, tips, research, and insights in preparing applications for certification.
In the second part of the session, participants will work in small groups to begin planning their own Level 2 and 3 training programs and activities. Finally, all participants will join in a large group discussion regarding “take aways” from this pre-conference institute and next steps for their individual program certification process.


Wednesday November 1, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Cambria East

1:00pm

Coaching Strategies: Building Bridges for Academic and Professional Success
Participants will learn strategies to coach students on setting goals, identifying challenges, and creating action plans. Through demonstrations and activities, attendees will experience coaching as a profound tool to help students learn to self-resource and develop resiliency for academic and professional success.

The institute begins with participants observing a live coaching demonstration. Five foundational coaching skills will then be highlighted from the demonstration and discussed. Participants will then divide into groups and use case studies for practicing specific coaching skills and approaches. A triad coaching exercise will then be introduced where each attendee experiences being the coach, coachee, and observer. The institute ends with participants reflecting, identifying opportunities, and setting goals for implementing coaching strategies in their respective roles.

Moderators
Speakers

Wednesday November 1, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Westmoreland Central

1:00pm

SIG/SRC Leaders Pre-Conference Institute
Being a SIG/SRC leader for CRLA can be challenging, and entails mostly independent work with few opportunities for collaboration. This institute provides SIG/SRC leaders with a dedicated space on the conference program for professional development. This institute brings current SIG/SRC leaders together to explore ways to better engage SIG/SRC members.

The institute will be highly interactive and conversation-based through a mixture of networking activities, informational mini-sessions, and brainstorming and idea-sharing discussions.

Moderators
Wednesday November 1, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Westmoreland East

1:00pm

Supporting Self and Students through Yoga and Mindfulness
Professional development will be provided through the practices of yoga and mindfulness for current and sustained self-care, the research behind yoga and mindfulness, and the introduction of basic practices and benefits of yoga and mindfulness for students.

This three hour workshop session will follow this format:
  • Yoga research - 35 minutes
  • Q&A - 10 minutes
  • Break - 10 minutes
  • Yoga practice - 50 minutes
  • Q&A - 10 minutes
  • Break - 10 minutes
  • Yoga/mindfulness implementation for self and students - 45 minutes
  • Q&A - 10 minutes

Participants are encouraged to wear appropriate yoga, fitness, and/or workout clothing and bring a yoga mat. Some mats will be provided by the workshop providers; advanced notice of the need of yoga mats is preferred. Accommodations will be made for participants during the workshop (i.e. clothing, differently abled, etc.).

Moderators

Wednesday November 1, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Butler West

1:00pm

Bridging Critical Thinking and Creative Design: A Digital Storytelling Workshop
This workshop encourages participants to explore digital/multimodal projects. “Hands-on” activities will provide participants with a broad overview of the process as well as hands-on experience with individual steps. The group will participate in group activities that ultimately speak to implementation and classroom applications.

The delivery method for the workshop is designed to be highly interactive. Student-produced examples will be shared, and then participants will be invited to map out their own digital story creation processes (storyboarding, narration development, music selection, etc.) via worksheets, small and large interactions, goal-setting, and question/answer times. Additionally, audience members will be invited to experiment with free, online software often used in story creations and, before leaving, workshop ways in which digital stories may be implemented when they return home. A primary goal is to assure participants of direct application of the practice.


Wednesday November 1, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Washington

1:00pm

Colleges Tour: Pittsburgh Colleges Tour
Ticket required. Space is limited to 29 people. Sign up using the conference registration process.  If space available, you can sign up at the registration desk at the conference. Cost= $24

Itinerary:
12:45 pm Meet in Westin lobby
1:00 pm Bus departs from Westin to Carlow University and the University of Pittsburgh
4:30 pm Bus returns to the Westin

Carlow University
Student led-tours of this small, private university with the unique connection to the Sisters of Mercy (it was the first location of the Sisters of Mercy in North America; the convent is still on campus). The old Grace Library was completely gutted and renovated in 2015 to create a University Commons, a LEED-certified building. This is where the Center for Academic Achievement is located. Carlow University’s Center for Academic Achievement (CAA) applies the best practices of the learning profession by contributing to the transformational educational experiences that occur both in and out of the classroom. The CAA provides quality academic support and promotes the adoption of transferable skills, thereby fostering resilience in traditional, adult, and graduate-level learners. Guided by core learning outcomes and the values of the Sisters of Mercy, the CAA optimizes learning by responding to the needs of each individual and helping students realize their full potential for academic success.

University of Pittsburgh Nationality Rooms
The Nationality Rooms are located in the University of Pittsburgh's Cathedral of Learning. The rooms were designed to represent the culture of various ethnic groups that settled in Allegheny County and are supported by these cultural groups and governments. The rooms are also in regular use as University classrooms in which students are in the midst of surroundings designed to enhance the learning experience. The emphasis on ethnic identity and the search for one’s ancestral roots is reflected in the committees formed to create new classrooms representing the cultures of Finland, Iran, and others in consideration. As these rooms take their places around the Commons Room, they will add new dimensions of pride and understanding to the unique totality of America’s heritage. A visit to the 30 Nationality Rooms in the 42-story Cathedral of Learning transports visitors from the 5th Century B.C. Athens through 1st Century Israel to 18th Century Africa. Stained glass, carved stone and inlaid wood reflect the cultures which Pittsburgh immigrants brought from Europe, Asia, Africa and the Middle East.


Wednesday November 1, 2017 1:00pm - 4:30pm
Carlow University and the University of Pittsburgh 3333 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213

6:15pm

Welcome Reception at the Heinz History Center
6:15pm – 9:15pm Welcome Reception at the Heinz History Center 
7:30 - 8:15 Tour of the Heinz History Center
Open To All 

Wednesday November 1, 2017 6:15pm - 10:00pm
Heinz History Center 1212 Smallman St. Pittsburgh, PA 15222
 
Thursday, November 2
 

7:30am

Session Chairs' Orientation
Session Chairs introduce presenters and distribute and collect evaluation forms from session attendees. Session Chair Orientation is held each morning for assignments. Benefits include a guaranteed seat at the session you're chairing and an opportunity to serve the association while getting to know the presenters and CRLA colleagues.

Thursday November 2, 2017 7:30am - 8:00am
Lawrence

7:30am

Registration
Thursday November 2, 2017 7:30am - 6:00pm
Allegheny Foyer

8:00am

Opening Keynote Address: Cynthia Shanahan and Breakfast (Open to All)

Breakfast
Welcome Address: Suzanne Mellon, Carlow University
Awards
Cynthia Shanahan - Keynote Speaker

Title of Session
Helping Students Succeed:  A Look at Disciplinary Literacy.



Description
This presentation will focus on the purposes that college reading classes should pay more attention to the differences in the various disciplines that students will study in college, such as History, Literature, Mathematics, and Science.  If students understand the purposes and practices of these disciplines they will be more likely to employ effective strategies for reading and writing as they move through their regular college coursework


Thursday November 2, 2017 8:00am - 10:00am
Allegheny Grand Ballroom

10:00am

Raffle Ticket Sales
Thursday November 2, 2017 10:00am - 5:30pm
Allegheny Foyer

10:15am

The Internet: A Game Changer - A Brain Changer
As developmental educators, we see students with weak educational backgrounds and poor study habits. Now, we may even have to work against the habits ingrained in them as they utilize the Internet. Join in the conversation about how technology is changing our brains.

During the roundtable Barb Zmolek will present information for a 30-minute time period, then pose questions to the participants, encourage discussion, and ask for comments from them about the information. I’m confident that we’ll begin building a bridge to span the gap between technology usage and deep information processing. I’m also confident that this bridge will be far from complete by the end of the session.

Moderators

Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Allegheny Grand II

10:15am

Engaging Readers in Critical Thinking and Cultural Literacy
The presenters will discuss the results of their research on engaging their students in critical thinking and cultural literacy in a developmental reading course and present students’ reader responses to culturally diverse texts. They will also engage the participants in sharing practices in promoting critical reading and cultural literacy.


The presenters will use PowerPoint in explaining the procedures that they followed in conducting their research on engaging readers in critical thinking and cultural literacy. They will present the results and conclusions. In addition, they will show sample students’ reading journal reports on their chosen culturally diverse texts. They will also engage the audience to ask questions and share their own practices to enhance their students’ critical reading and cultural literacy. The presenters will distribute handouts.

Moderators
Speakers


Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Westmoreland East

10:15am

Re-inventing Remedial Reading: A Reading Course Going Hybrid
Remedial courses have been the center of attention over the past decade. More students enter college and take at least one remedial course. Does this impact a student's identity? This presentation re-examines remedial reading in the 21st century and the implementation of a remedial reading hybrid course.

This presentation will provide faculty with results from student surveys in the hybrid reading course. Faculty will be provided with student's results and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of a hybrid reading course. We will also discuss how we can re-invent college reading to engage the learner in the 21st century.

Moderators
Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Butler West

10:15am

Bridging the Digital Gap in Developmental Literacy
Integrated Reading and Writing (IRW) has become a useful option for Developmental Education courses. Building student digital identities through integrating digital literacies into IRW courses informed our instruction. Come hear how we examined the growth of students’ digital identities while enrolled in IRW courses and the pedagogy we used.

Our presentation will begin with an overview of our study, including the context, participants, and rationale. After discussing the use of hybrid texts (Lea & Jones, 2011) and multimodal meaning making (Cope & Kalantzis, 2009), we will show the steps to implementing our study and how it informed our instruction. After viewing a sample of data from participants, a whole group discussion about implementation will be facilitated. Following this discussion, session participants will be provided with our instructional lessons, materials, and strategies, as well as the opportunity to brainstorm other opportunities for building upon students’ digital literacies.


Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Cambria East

10:15am

Using Protest Music to Increase Students’ Awareness of Fake News
Our presentation demonstrates how the integration of critical literacy into IRW can have profound results on students’ understanding of the argumentative genre, and on their knowledge of academic Discourses. Participants will receive and discuss our study’s results on students’ perceptions of integrating critical literacy into the IRW course.
We will provide a brief, standard Power Point presentation to showcase our review of literature, methodology, and findings. Additionally, we will provide participants with artifacts from the IRW class where we collected data. We will also present the argumentative unit where critical literacy was implemented via an active PBworks page to promote collaboration amongst the attendees. In groups, attendees will modify a unit to fit their unique programs, through resources we provide. Implications and conclusions will be generated at the end.


We will provide a brief, standard Power Point presentation to showcase our review of literature, methodology, and findings. Additionally, we will provide participants with artifacts from the IRW class where we collected data. We will also present the argumentative unit where critical literacy was implemented via an active PBworks page to promote collaboration amongst the attendees. In groups, attendees will modify a unit to fit their unique programs, through resources we provide. Implications and conclusions will be generated at the end.

Moderators
Speakers

Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Allegheny Grand II

10:15am

Building E-Bridges: Using Your Own Tutors for Online Tutoring
Imagine using your own tutors to provide online tutoring... Come learn more about the success of GoBoard’s latest pilot with several universities. GoBoard.com provides free consultations and software to equip their own tutors to provide online tutoring. Come learn how to replicate this at your institution!

We will utilize GoBoard during the session so that participants can see the utility of the software. We will also feature one of the participating pilot universities and their perspectives on the implementation. The participants will also receive a case study to bring back to their campus to get hardware funded and the program approved at their school.

Moderators
Speakers


Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Crawford East

10:15am

Building Bridges for Academic Texts: Students’ Experiences with PILLAR
This study investigated the application of a reading strategy device to explore underlying cognitive and metacognitive reading processes. Session participants will learn about the think-aloud procedures implemented to elicit students’ metacognitive processes as students attempted to make sense of larger concepts within biology and history textbook passages and findings.

This is a 60-minute presentation supplemented with a PowerPoint presentation highlighting the findings of the study. Participants will be able to ask questions and partake in discussion regarding possible implications and uses.

Speakers
SA

Sonya Armstrong

Texas State University
JL

Jodi Lampi

Northern Illinois University,Academic Literacy andLearning


Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Pennsylvania East

10:15am

Hook, Line and Sink "em - Improve Student Retention
A crucial issue that US colleges face today is retention. In this session, we will share insights about the practices we use at Principia College to support struggling learners. We will share how we track the progress and retention of our students using tools to support motivation, resilience, and persistence.

During this 60-minute session, you will learn how effective, engaging, and hands-on activities, such as EDpuzzle, GAFE, Socrative, Reminders, Chat Bots and more, can and do support students of all levels of academics. This session is designed for anyone wanting applicable and meaningful strategies. Audience participation is encouraged. This session is geared towards individuals who work with struggling students or are on academic probation, but all are invited to attend!

Moderators
Speakers


Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Armstrong

10:15am

IMTPC & ITTPC: Celebrating Successful Mentoring and Tutoring Programs!
Mentoring and tutoring programs that are research-based and strategically implemented can have a powerful impact on your learning program. Explore the Tutor and Mentor Training Program Certifications (ITTPC and IMTPC) of CRLA. Learn what is involved in developing these programs and the benefits and outcomes of tutoring and mentoring programs.

The presenter will share detailed information (verbal, Google Slides, and handouts) about the IMTPC and ITTPC certification programs and will encourage audience participation and questions throughout the hour-long concurrent session.

Moderators

Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Pennsylvania West

10:15am

Building Bridges between the CAS Standards and Program Evaluation
The Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS) recently approved the revised Learning Assistance Program (LAP) Standards which learning assistance programs may use for self-assessment and program evaluation. Participants will learn about these updated standards, about resources for program evaluation, and new CAS directions for assessment.


This session will have several formats:
(1) A Powerpoint presentation containing=:
(a) brief overview of CAS,
(b) description of the CAS LAP standards;
(c) information on how CRLA members can access the CAS LAP standards without cost;
(d) description of how the CAS LAP standards can guide program evaluation;
(e) description of new directions for LAP standards, particularly in using the new multi-standard framework.
(2) Audience participation and discussion focusing on the:
(a) analysis of the updated LAP standards,
(b) connection of the updated LAP standards to one’s own program.

Moderators

Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Washington

10:15am

NCLCA: Supporting Learning Center Professionals
NCLCA defines learning centers as interactive, academic spaces existing to reinforce and extend student learning in physical and/or virtual environments. A variety of comprehensive support services and programs are offered in these environments to enhance student academic success, retention, and completion rates by applying from multiple pedagogical perspectives.

This will be presented through a lecture, workshop, and activities

Moderators

Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Lawrence

10:15am

CRLA Tutors in Non-Course Based Math Lab Homeroom
A Non-Course Based Option designed as a co-requisite, one credit lab to first-year math courses is structured as a "homeroom". CRLA tutors are embedded in the math labs to provide support to enrolled students. In fall 2016, 91 students enrolled in these labs and 88% passed their math course.

This presentation will describe the current NCBM model that has been successful at TAMUK, a HSI, as well as the evolution of the program design. Many of the students enrolling in our NCBM courses are first generation students and/or Latino students, and this model for transitional coursework has increased the passing rate of credit based math courses by 14% since fall of 2015. Participants in this session will understand how the Non-Course Based Option is designed as a co-requisite, one credit lab to first-year math courses. The session will explain the benefit of having an embedded tutor in the lab, and present the data gathered over the last 2 years to support the success of the model.


Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Somerset East

10:15am

A bridge to academic success: peer coaching for at-risk students
Statistical data shows that more than a significant number of students begin college but do not persist past their first year, which is not congruent with their previous academic skills. The ACHIEVE peer coaching program was developed for students who are in academic jeopardy (less than a 2.0).

This presentation is designed to assist others in the development of a peer coaching program. This program is unique in that it uses best practices from student affairs and academic affairs.
The delivery method will be power-point, developed intake forms, program information, training manuals and guides.



Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Cambria West

10:15am

A Streamlined Training Program for Supplemental Instruction Leaders
This session will provide a description of how the United States Naval Academy implements an effective, condensed training program to prepare their Supplemental Instruction leaders to facilitate peer-led sessions. The presenter will share the training sessions and resources that focus on self-regulated and collaborative learning techniques.

The presenter will include an overview of Kansas City’s Supplemental Instruction program and explain how our Supplemental Instruction benefits students. The session will also highlight the role of peer-leaders and the expectation in place for their performance. In detail, the presenter will outline and discuss the purpose behind the United States Naval Academy’s expedited Supplemental Instruction Program and their key training strategies covered. The final 15-20 minutes of the session will be open for questions and discussion of best practices for peer-led training programs.

Moderators
Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Allegheny Grand II

10:15am

Learning Assistance Experience and Teaching in Higher Education
LAP administrators believe their learning experience has significantly impacted their classroom teaching experiences and pedagogical abilities. This study suggests that LAP administrators are undervalued as a resource on campus, and that their teaching experiences should be valued more greatly.


The session will begin with presentation of research (20 min). Then the session will be interactive.

Moderators
JT

Jack Trammell

CRLA President

Speakers


Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Westmoreland Central

10:15am

The Kellogg Experience
This session will discuss the benefits of attending the Kellogg Institute's new two-week format.It will also discuss the other products produced at the NCDE as well as the graduate degree in Higher Education from Appalachian State University.

Moderators
Speakers

Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Butler East

10:15am

Effective Practices of a CTE Embedded Tutoring Program
This presentation will detail the findings of the program evaluation of an embedded tutoring program supporting a career and technical education programs at a community college. 

This presentation will consist of an overview of an embedded tutoring program at a community college’s career and technical education campus with a focus on the conception of its current evaluation processes. Attendees will be encouraged to participate by responding to and asking relevant questions regarding the importance of an effective program evaluation at CTE colleges. Additionally, participants will engage in a discussion about possible evaluation designs for their institutions.

Moderators
Speakers

Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Westmoreland West

10:15am

The Senior Culminating Experience: A Vehicle For Collaboration and Community
This session will discuss the structure of the senior culminating experience as well as its literary themes, student preparation for research, writing and presentation, its role in fostering community and its role in students’ success after graduation.

We will present our findings via PPT and provide the audience with a handout outlining the benefits of implementing the senior culminating experience into a Capstone Course as well as the specific components of the senior culminating experience related to our department's Capstone Course.

Moderators
Speakers

Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Allegheny Grand II

10:15am

Bridging the academic/athletic divide: Implementing a summer literacy program
The purpose of this study was to understand how athletic professionals and faculty can work together to create a literacy program to support incoming football freshman student-athletes and the multiple literacies in which they participate in on a daily basis, in college setting. Often student-athletes are negatively stereotyped by their peers and professors as lacking the “student” aspect of student-athlete (Cutler, 2009), and chronically underperform in the classroom and struggle with academic inequities throughout their college years (Beamon & Bell, 2006; Benson, 2000; Umbach, Palmer, Kuh, & Hannah, 2006). These stereotypes and statistics need to be addressed and one way to do that is to create a working and collaborative relationship between professors and athletic personnel.

This qualitative study addresses two questions: (1) How does research and theory become practical in a literacy program with the input of a learning specialist? (2) What are the main tenants of collaboration between faculty and athletics when designing a literacy program?

This presentation will give the results of the study; tips of how to work across the college setting; and offer practical advice of how to foster collaboration when creating a summer program for student-athletes.

Moderators
Speakers

Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Fayette

10:15am

Learning Assistance for Competency-Based Education: Minding the Gaps
With online competency-based education (CBE) in its infancy, little scholarly work has been done to assess student academic support needs in this modality. Early observations, however, call for learning assistance supports for CBE students. This presentation explores one institution’s approach and emerging best practices based on demonstrated need areas.


This session will incorporate a PowerPoint presentation with a demonstration of a Springshare LibGuide created to support the CBE student learning experience. The presenter will ask the participants clarifying questions to determine their level of familiarity with CBE in general as well as their experience with addressing learning assistance for CBE in order to customize the presentation as much as possible while still adhering to the proposed session objectives. Printed copies of PowerPoint presentation will be provided as a handout, and participants will also have access to the publicly available Springshare LibGuide content after the session.

Speakers


Thursday November 2, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Somerset West

11:30am

SRC-AR/LA_Ch, California Ch
Thursday November 2, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Pennsylvania West

11:30am

SRC -Great Lakes Ch
Thursday November 2, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Westmoreland West

11:30am

SRC -Hawaii Ch, Northwest Ch
Thursday November 2, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Armstrong

11:30am

SRC -Mid-Atlantic
Thursday November 2, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Butler West

11:30am

SRC -Northeast Ch
Thursday November 2, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Cambria East

11:30am

SRC -Northeast Ch
Thursday November 2, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Cambria East

11:30am

SRC -Ohio River Valley
Thursday November 2, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Butler East

11:30am

SRC -Texas
Thursday November 2, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Fayette

11:30am

SRC-Alaska Ch, Canada Ch
Thursday November 2, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Armstrong

11:30am

SRC-Arizona-Nevada Ch
Thursday November 2, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Lawrence

11:30am

SRC-Heartland Ch
Thursday November 2, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Washington

11:30am

SRC-Mid-South Ch
Thursday November 2, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Westmoreland East

11:30am

SRC-PA/NJ Ch
Thursday November 2, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Cambria West

11:30am

SRC-Southeast Ch
Thursday November 2, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Somerset West

11:30am

SRC-Wyoming-Colorado Ch, Utah Ch, New Mexico Ch
Thursday November 2, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Allegheny Grand II

11:30am

SRC -MN/SD/ND Ch
Thursday November 2, 2017 11:30am - 1:00pm
Somerset East

12:30pm

JCRL Lunch
Thursday November 2, 2017 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Crawford East

1:00pm

Exhibit hall opens
Thursday November 2, 2017 1:00pm - 7:00pm
Allegheny Foyer

1:45pm

Evaluating effectiveness and types of learning methods in the classroom
Learning methods and differentiated instruction continue to attract a lot of attention. Research shows some clear results related to the academic effectiveness of these different methods. Which methods can work? Which methods have worked for you? Is there more about these methods than simply obtaining higher academic scores?

For this roundtable there will be a 2-page handout with details on various research that has been completed in the area of learning styles and differentiated instruction. The handout will show where it has been proven to work and where there are areas of unknowns. The end will include a number of prompts to engage the participants during the discussion time.

Moderators

Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Allegheny Grand II

1:45pm

Bridging Literacy & Learning through Disciplinary Meaning Making Practices
This session highlights a case study inquiry into how undergraduates construct and enact literacy knowledge in disciplinary contexts. The researcher will present the study’s design, findings, and implications for practice and research. Participants will also discuss the potential of sociocultural perspectives in advancing our understanding and support of college literacy.

The presentation will consist of an overview of the research study, detailing the literature and theoretical framework, methods, and analytic procedures used in the inquiry. The presenter will then discuss the initial findings of the study, using student participants’ accounts to support the analysis and highlight their agency as disciplinary learners. Time will be given throughout the presentation for participant questions. The session will conclude with small group discussions about the nature of reading in disciplinary contexts, how educators can support students’ development of disciplinary literacy knowledge, and opportunities for further inquiry into understanding of college reading practices and outcomes.

Moderators
Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Lawrence

1:45pm

Reading Across the Disciplines: Expanding our Current Program
For this roundtable there will be a 2-page handout with details on various research that has been completed in the area of learning styles and differentiated instruction. The handout will show where it has been proven to work and where there are areas of unknowns. The end will include a number of prompts to engage the participants during the discussion time.

This presentation will begin with a PowerPoint presentation giving information about the program. Then, we will break into small groups to discuss current methods being used at different schools and best practices. Finally, we will have a large-group discussion about what was learned during the break out time.

Moderators
Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Allegheny Grand II

1:45pm

The Protégé Effect: Learning by Teaching in College Reading
Learning by teaching is not a new concept and is often considered one of the most effective ways to learn. This session includes a discussion on the idea of providing college reading students with the opportunity to become “teachers” in order to increase learning and overall academic success.

First, this session will provide a brief presentation that includes background information, theoretical framework and previous research that highlights the effectiveness of learning by teaching. Next, participants will get a glimpse into a College Reading class that requires students to teach content they are learning in their college courses to their peers – both in small and whole class settings. Sample teaching presentations and student reflections will be shared and discussed. Finally, time will be allotted for open discussion focusing on future ideas and feedback on utilizing a learning by teaching framework in a developmental reading course.

Moderators
Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Somerset West

1:45pm

I Read, I Write, I Think, I Create
This session provides an exchange of ideas on how technology can help students thread ideas and make connections as readers, writers, and critical thinkers. It introduces students’ websites that integrate reading, writing, metacognition and technology. These sites exemplify multifaceted literacy skills and demonstrate student growth and metacognitive awareness.

We will utilize a large group discussion with a power point presentation followed by small group discussion with questions and answers. Attendees will be encouraged to share expertise on ways they have used technology to enhance students’ reading and writing skills. In addition, attendees will consider ways their use of technology has influenced their own reading and writing skills. Handouts will be provided for further analysis of the issues presented.

Moderators
Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Cambria West

1:45pm

Using Screencasting to Close the Digital Divide in Writing Revision
This “best practices” session will demonstrate the ability to screencast, or video record one’s desktop with audio, in order to offer students detailed feedback on writing assignments. The session will also discuss the ways screencasting aids our students, digital natives, to comprehend feedback and apply revision strategies to their writing.

This concurrent session seeks to include the audience throughout. First, participants will engage in goal setting to determine specific interests and concerns surrounding the implementation of screencasting. Throughout the remainder of the presentation, participants will engage in small group discussions, large group feedback, brainstorming, and question and answer time. The presenters will provide worksheets, handouts, PowerPoint slides, as well as take-aways that offer specific examples of and suggestions for screencasting software.

Moderators
Speakers

Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Pennsylvania East

1:45pm

Creating A Flexible, Ongoing & Sustainable Tutor Training Program
Every tutoring center would like to provide quality tutor training, as it prepares tutors to actively help students succeed. However, the demands of many tutoring coordinators limit the time they can spend training tutors. This session will explore online tutor training videos focused on supporting the tutor training process 24/7.

Speakers

Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Westmoreland East

1:45pm

How's That Workin for Ya?
At <redacted-institute name> we have observed that students do not use their time efficiently.
Coaches have found providing students with a planner, modeling effective strategies for use, allows students to better manage their time and become proactive in seeking out time management strategies that best suit their individual needs.

The session will be a power point presentation with a hands on workshop that will include planner sheets along with a sample syllabus to construct a sample student planner. Materials will be provided for participants to creatively add color, images, stickers, etc. to their sample planners.

Moderators
Speakers

Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Allegheny Grand II

1:45pm

STEPS to Success: An Academic Social Norming Campaign
Using the social norms approach, the STEPS to Success Campaign used data collected from current students in order to promote positive academic skills and behaviors on campus. Using printed materials and classroom presentations, this powerful intervention helped students discover the recipe for success at their specific institution.

To share information regarding the background, methods, and results of STEPS to Success with my audience, Betsy Carter will present the information via a straightforward Powerpoint presentation. However, for audience engagement, she will share physical examples of posters, brochures, and bookmarks. To demonstrate the social norms approach, She will also have the audience participate in an interactive survey via Kahoot (online game) to demonstrate how perceived and actual norms differ. This was also an interactive tool she used to reinforce the academic messages when I conduced STEPS classroom presentations with students.

Moderators
Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Butler East

1:45pm

Building a Budget Bridge
Saving money can be gratifying for learning assistance center managers who look beyond the rigidity of numbers and see an opportunity for resourcefulness. Building a bridge to connect the budget with the learning center’s goals will be developed through unique cost-effective ideas and a specially designed budget bridge worksheet.

In this session, each participant will build their own “budget bridge” using the information presented. They will be introduced to the topics via a PowerPoint presentation. Ideas from multiple managers will be woven into the presentation through reports and discussion during the presentation. 

Moderators
Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Butler West

1:45pm

Identifying and supporting students with learning disabilitiesin IRW programs
This presentation examines the current state of students with disclosed and non-disclosed learning disabilities and differences and the effect of these maladies on the successful completion of IRW courses. The discussion will include strategies to identify students with learning disabilities and ways of creating bridges for their academic success.

PowerPoints, handouts and large group discussions of remediation practices currently in place will be used. There will be opportunity for questions and comments. The presenter will also draw on classroom experiences, background with special needs students, and data related to student placement furnished from Academic Advising and Placement.

Moderators

Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Westmoreland West

1:45pm

Disciplinary Literacy as a Bridge to Success in Mathematics
This session provides information about the nature of reading in mathematics and strategies math faculty and tutors can use to help students improve their disciplinary literacy skills. It includes information on math-specific literacy skills and classroom practices that support and scaffold students’ comprehension.

This presentation will consist of 8 - 15 minutes of an introduction on the research from the field of disciplinary literacy. The next 30 to 40 minutes will involve participants in text analysis and discussions, and will allow them to experience active learning reading strategies that can be used in a mathematics classroom. Some of the strategies will include the use of graphic organizers, anticipation guides, and discussion groups. The presenters will provide examples of actual math text and explore the ways a student interacts with that text. The last 5- 10 minutes will be used for reflections and questions.

Moderators
Speakers


Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Westmoreland Central

1:45pm

Women in STEM: The Power of a Growth Mindset
This presentation will be an overview of a growth mindset-focused seminar series for undergraduate women in STEM majors at [university name redacted]. The presentation will discuss the rationale for the program, describe the development and content, and review outcomes.

The delivery of the presentation will be via power point, along with handouts, demonstrations of activities, and a question and answer session.



Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Cambria East

1:45pm

Becoming an ITTPC reviewer
This informal session is for anyone curious about becoming an ITTPC reviewer. The ITTPC Coordinator and current reviewers will explain the review process, the requirements of becoming a reviewer and the benefits of joining the reviewer team. There will be opportunities for questions, suggestions and feedback from the session participants.


This will be an informal session. Current reviewers will discuss the benefits of becoming a reviewer, the requirements and time commitment involved in the process. We will demonstrate an online training module and answer questions that potential reviewers may have.

Moderators
Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Fayette

1:45pm

Developing Strategic, Individualized, and Data-Informed Networks of Support
We will share a data-informed framework of student success by highlighting a collaborative and effectively intrusive network of support established between our First-Year Advising and Academic Achievement Centers. This nexus provides critical guidance and support to academically vulnerable students with strategically targeted and structured opportunities for holistic student development.

The Dean of Advising & First Year Programs, and Director of the Academic Achievement Center will interactively discuss the 1) evolution of advising and academic supports at the institution, 2) formulation of a strategically structured, individualized, and targeted network of support, and 3) share data from 5 cohorts of participants in a concentrated academic support plan. The topic will be presented for approximately 40 minutes (participants will be encouraged to engage and ask questions throughout), with the last 20 minutes set aside for an interactive discussion of best practices and practical applications for data/research-driven learning assistance programming.

Moderators
Speakers


Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Armstrong

1:45pm

Outcome-Based Assessments: Bridging Academic Skills and Career Readiness
Using outcomes-based assessment to evaluate general education literacies and professional skills helps college students understand the relationship between assignments and career skills. This roundtable will discuss the value of outcome based assessment at the institutional and program level as well as the benefits for students and faculty.

Participants will provide an overview of using General Education Literacies and Professional Competencies, followed by a participant driven discussion focusing on designing outcomes, creating effective rubrics, and building student portfolios that will make students more competitive in the job market. Sample rubrics will be shared with the group, along with examples of outcomes for various courses.


Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Allegheny Grand II

1:45pm

Placement Testing Success; Cut-Scores that Connect College Readiness to Curriculum
College Board’s ACCUPLACER placement tests provide an invaluable tool to accurately assess incoming students’ readiness for college-level coursework. This session offers participants a comprehensive framework and methodology for developing effective ACCUPLACER cut-scores that align with desired English and mathematics curricula outcomes, including: data-driven decision making, faculty collaboration, advising, and assessment.

During the presentation participants will have the opportunity to complete an abbreviated placement testing assessment that highlights the need for cut-scores and placements tailored to individual learning needs. They will also have the opportunity to actively engage with one another in a role-playing exercise designed to illustrate the various expertise pertinent campus staff and partners contribute to placement testing cut-score evaluation and alignment with introductory English and mathematics course curricula.

Moderators
Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Washington

1:45pm

Results of a State-wide Quasi-experiment on Accelerated Reading & Writing
This project evaluated pedagogical outcomes of a state-mandated curricular shift to Integrated Reading and Writing coursework in Texas. Asking the question, “Does IRW work better than stand-alone reading and stand-alone writing?” this session presents the results of research on the efficacy of IRW courses across all Texas community college districts.

We will use a PPT as a visual aid but will focus on engaging the audience through rich description of the study, its outcomes, its impact, and links to the classroom. A handout will be provided for attendees. Two graduate students involved in this project will be a part of the presentation team.


Thursday November 2, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Pennsylvania West

2:00pm

CLADEA meeting
Thursday November 2, 2017 2:00pm - 5:00pm
Crawford East

3:00pm

Building Bridges, Not Silos: Rethinking Today’s Academic Library/Learning Space
This session will offer the narrative of how one of the worst academic libraries re-defined itself by 'bridging' with other academic units to rethink the role of the academic library.

The presenter of this session will utilize a PowerPoint that will not only detail the physical changes that occurred in their campus library, but also the administrative changes that re-energized this underused campus resource. The session will begin with a basic history of the problems identified in preparation for SACSCOC reaffirmation, then detail best practices for the library’s transformation into an academic leraning center. In addition to a photographic journey of the process, the session will also include handouts for attendees and a period for them to create their own Plan for Change.

Moderators
Speakers

Thursday November 2, 2017 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Armstrong

3:00pm

Publishing in the Journal of College Reading and Learning
This session will provide an opportunity to meet the newest
members of the Journal of College Reading and Learning editorial team. The team will share
information on the special anniversary issue, new directions for JCRL, and practical guidance
and insights about manuscript development and submission for publication with JCRL.

Moderators
SA

Sonya Armstrong

Texas State University

Thursday November 2, 2017 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Washington

3:00pm

Bridging Developmental Reading, Writing and Critical Thinking Using Thematic Units
Integrating reading, writing, and critical thinking equally can be challenging. Thematic units provide the platform to support all three crucial areas equally. This panel will demonstrate the planning of engaging thematic units using backwards design, share classroom-tested units, and describe strategies for experiences in reading, writing, and critical thinking.

The presentation content will be delivered though PowerPoint, interactive classroom case studies, and small and large group discussion. The chair will begin with an overview of backwards design and components of effective thematic units. Using this framework, three panelists will demonstrate how they translate this research/theory into practice using sample lessons and student work. The chair will then facilitate an interactive discussion in which participants will share ideas for adopting thematic units in their respective classrooms. This will also be an opportunity for dialogue between the panelists and presenters.



Thursday November 2, 2017 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Pennsylvania East

3:00pm

Building Bridges to Careers: Assignments That Enhance Professional Skills
An online university offers introductory level courses that develop students’ academic and professional writing skills. The panel will discuss the courses, key assignments that enhance students’ communication, digital literacy, and job preparation skills, and other strategies that faculty can use to help students be more prepared for the job market.

This panel will consist of three speakers and two chairs who have taught and designed courses in composition and career preparation. After each speaker reviews key talking points about the courses, their purpose, and assignments that hone professional writing skills, the panel will encourage discussion from attendees regarding strategies for revising composition courses to better meet employers’ needs and to create courses that will help students better prepare for a competitive job market.

Panelists and the chair will also share assignment examples and encourage participants to discuss assignments that they use to help students develop professional and digital literacy skills.



Thursday November 2, 2017 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Butler West

3:00pm

Learning Styles: Bridging Differences between Traditional Practices and Current Research
Many learning centers and tutor training programs incorporate discussion and activities related to learning styles. However current research tends to consider learning styles with skepticism. Through discussion and group activity, this session will explore best practices that reconcile how both may be of value.

This session will utilize a variety of presentational techniques. These include, but are not limited to the following: PowerPoint, discussion, brainstorming and group activity.

The group activity is an important element of the session as it encourages interaction among session participants, reinforces recognizing differing learning styles or preferences and how they affect group dynamics, and it provides a valuable tie-in to the conference theme. Participants will be divided into groups according to their learning style or preference. Each group will be tasked with determining how to best move four hypothetical travelers across a bridge while following prescribed guidelines.

Moderators
Thursday November 2, 2017 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Westmoreland East

3:00pm

First Year in a Learning Center: Navigation, Support, and Guidance
Have you transitioned into a learning assistance center in an entry, mid-level, or director position and questioned how to thrive in the role? Personal experiences, survey results, and theoretical frameworks will guide this interactive session; participants will discover best practices for being effective in their first year.

The presenters will be using a slideshow presentation as the primary visual aid throughout the workshop. Audience engagement will be implemented through a variety of methods, including an interactive survey which participants will respond to during the workshop to spark conversation and gather various experiences and perspectives. Additionally, participants will be divided into small groups to discuss obstacles they have witnessed or experienced. The large group will then have a discussion about solutions and strategies for facilitating an impactful and smooth first-year transition into a learning assistance center.

View Presentation File via Google Drive Here


Thursday November 2, 2017 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Butler East

3:00pm

Strengthening Faculty Relationships to Strengthen Student Learning
This interactive workshop will help learning support program staff maximize faculty partnerships. Presenters will share a highly networked model, including faculty development programs. Participants will map opportunities, complete an analysis of priorities, and create an action plan for strengthening bridges to faculty partnerships to enhance student learning.

Presenters will demonstrate various models of faculty partnerships, including ways to integrate learning support staff and/or programs with faculty development; participants will map current collaborations and future opportunities at their own institutions.

Presenters will facilitate a SWOT analysis activity; participants will identify strengths, brainstorm ways to circumvent potential weaknesses, make a plan to leverage or enlist likely allies, and anticipate ways to overcome possible obstacles in strengthening faculty partnerships.

Participants will give and receive feedback on their analyses.

Participants will complete an action plan to take back to their institutions.

Moderators
Speakers


Thursday November 2, 2017 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Westmoreland West

3:00pm

A Bridge Worth Building: Campus-wide CRLA Certified Tutor Training Course
In this workshop, we will present on the delivery method of our tutor training course and the benefits of collaborating to provide a single CRLA certified training course for peer educators across campus. Participants will identify, draft, and review a topics schedule for their training courses that utilizes campus partners.

Representatives from 2 of the 4 departments (Housing and Undergraduate Education) will facilitate the workshop through:
- Introductions
- Description of CRLA certified training course
- Draft creation of a syllabus
- Group discussion on potential resources, allies, and campus partners.
- Challenges and potential areas of improvement.
- Q&A


Thursday November 2, 2017 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Somerset East

3:00pm

Bridge the Gap: Interactive Learning Activities Improve Tutor Training Effectiveness
Student engagement in tutor training is essential for an effective training program. This session presents ways to evaluate how engaging an activity is and introduces participants to activities they can use in training. Participants will take away two interactive and engaging activities they can customize to achieve many learning outcomes.

Warm-up: Brief direct instruction to introduce ourselves and give background of our Tutoring Center, its training philosophy, and its training history.
Activities: Sample interactive training activities with follow-up debrief and discussion
Conclusion: Wrap-up discussion & handouts

Moderators
Speakers


Thursday November 2, 2017 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Cambria West

3:00pm

Building better tutor training with standards, outcomes and assessments
Tutor training programs are more effective with standards, outcomes, and assessment (SOA) metrics in place. We will be discussing best practices for SOA development, and the ITTPC guidelines for standards. We’ll also introduce how to develop measurable standards, outcomes and assessments, and how to integrate them into your training program.

The presentation will include:
1. Powerpoint (to guide the discussion)
2. Activities (matching SOAs, labeling activities, moving around the room)
3. Small- and Large-group Discussion & Pair work
4. Q&A



Thursday November 2, 2017 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Westmoreland Central

3:00pm

Creating and Publishing the Blueprints: Tutor Tips and Projects
This workshop will share the bridge from tutor tips /techniques to a demo of a culminating project for CRLA Certification (3) to publication. Participants will have the opportunity to share their own tutor created ideas. A free model for publishing and celebrating these great ideas will be demoed and discussed.

•Each presenter using PowerPoint will share the concept of celebrating tutor created materials from tips and techniques to an example of CRLA certification Level 3 final project.

•Audience engagement includes small group discussion and reporting out with half sheets of color paper to the wall size “sticky wall” for all to see.

•Presenters will facilitate small group discussions and posting of ideas for large group summary.

•A demonstration will include how the “recipes” can be published online in an established student centered web site set up for sharing tutor tips and techniques


Thursday November 2, 2017 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Pennsylvania West

3:00pm

Enhancing Self-Directed Learning in SI Leaders
The presenter will give an overview of the training format and priorities of an established SI program, highlighting several best practices for fostering self-directed learning in leaders. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss and share best practices from their programs for encouraging critical engagement in the self-directed learning process.

The Supplemental Instruction and EXCEL Collaborative Learning Group Program Coordinator will give an overview of one university’s undergraduate collaborative learning programs, featuring the training format and priorities and highlighting several of the program’s best practices for fostering self-directed learning in leaders.

Participants will have the opportunity to discuss and share their best practices for encouraging self-assessment, collaborative learning technique mastery, critical engagement, reflection, and creativity for fostering self-directed learning in student leaders and their sessions.

Speakers

Thursday November 2, 2017 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Somerset West

3:00pm

Academic Coaching: A Bridge to Student Empowerment, Engagement and Growth
Presenters have provided academic coaching, a powerful form of support in higher education, for over a decade, and have trained university professionals on this method of student support. This session will train participants in the fundamental principles of academic coaching and guide them to implement training for their staff.

The Pre-Conference Institute will be based on two successful training programs developed by The [University name redacted]’s learning center over the last three years: our coach approach training delivered to over 175 faculty and staff, and our academic coaching training week delivered annually to graduate student academic coaches.

This Pre-Conference Institute will be delivered interactively, mixing digital presentations of academic coaching with frequent discussion, live demonstrations, and participant interaction including practice of coaching skills and design of professional development plans.

Moderators
Speakers

Thursday November 2, 2017 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Cambria East

3:00pm

Bridging the Gap Between Your Research Questions and Student Experiences
Staff needed to quickly develop skills in qualitative research to evaluate Entangled Learning, a process model for learning being implemented at Clemson. We will share our challenges in planning and conducting research, provide examples of approaches we considered and adopted, and lead participants in developing new skills for their projects.

Presenters will provide an overview of the landscape of research that can be used. The overview will be made in the context of our decisions during a current research project. Audience members will have the opportunity to work with samples of qualitative data to gain experience with decision-making and procedures for coding and analyzing narrative documents. Audience members will also have opportunity to brainstorm initial research questions and develop an initial plan for pursuing their own research projects. Presenters and participants will discuss potential challenges and decision points inherent in these initial plans.

Moderators
Speakers

Thursday November 2, 2017 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Lawrence

4:45pm

ALL SIGs
Thursday November 2, 2017 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Allegheny Grand II

6:00pm

Authors' Book Signing (Open to All)

Table #1
Kellner, D. J. (2018). Reading Strategies for College and Beyond, San Diego, CA: Cognella
The Second Edition has been substantially revised following an extensive peer review. Each module has been updated and edited according to reviewer comments and student feedback. The text offers simple, practical strategies designed to lead students to a successful college career. The strategies have a range of applications in a variety of disciplines and can be useful tools for both students and teachers seeking new ways to engage students in reading. As each reading strategy is learned, it is practiced and applied to reading excerpts and then again applied to the students' reading assignments from other courses. The new edition contains new reading excerpts from a variety of disciplines in order to facilitate student's learning, no matter their major. 

This text is offered as a hard copy and can also be downloaded digitally. 

 

Table #2
Covington, M., von Hoene, L., Voge, D. (2017). Life Beyond Grades: Designing college courses to promote intrinsic motivation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press ISBN: 9780521805230
This book considers whether educators can promote intrinsic motivation among college students when they seem overwhelmingly focused on grades: Can there be life beyond grades? The answer is 'Yes'. A love of learning can coexist, even thrive, in the face of pressures from grades. Drawing on recent, ground-breaking classroom research, the authors articulate a new understanding of the causes of the stalemate between intrinsic and external motivation, and propose a reconciliation. Then the authors apply a powerful set of motivational and pedagogical principles to lay out a step-by-step blueprint for designing and teaching college courses that promote intrinsic motivation.

 

Table #3
Turrentine, P. (2015). Champions in the Classroom. Lanham, MA: Rowman and Littlefield Publishing Group, Inc. ISBN 978-1-4758-1822-2
Little has been written about the problems student-athletes encounter in attempting to balance their sports with the grueling demand for academic success in classrooms. As a resource guide for professionals, Champions in the Classroom offers a model and historical perspective for understanding the challenges faced by "student-athletes" while providing solutions and guidance to put the needed emphasis on "student." Penny Turrentine also provides a "Playbook," written in jargon that athletes understand, which offers students the methods for not only testing themselves but to easily understand their strengths and weaknesses. This book strives to conquer academic problems that student-athletes face and shows how to win in the classroom.

 

Table #4
Hamer, A. (2013). First Semester Success: Learning Strategies and Motivation for Your First Semester (or Any Semester) of College. Tarentum, PA: Word Association. ISBN: 978-1-59571-945-4
This book is unique in that it has 100 short strategies and motivational tips to daily guide freshmen through their first semester, starting with things to consider before as well as after the semester when grades have been received.   As a result of my experiences with freshmen and students on academic probation, the writing is concise and to the point and the format uses bullet points with plenty of white space.  The book was not intended to be a textbook, but it is being used in that way.  It is available at amazon.com and barnesandnoble.com, although most sales are through Folletts (wholesale textbook supplier) from the publisher.

Pabis, D. & Hamer, A. (2014). Basic College Vocabulary Strategies (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NY: Pearson. ISBN: 978-0-321-83893-3
This is a vocabulary textbook for use in lower level developmental reading courses with an approximately eighth to tenth grade reading level.   What makes both this book and the higher-level book, Building College Vocabulary Strategies, unique is that we have included learning and study strategies that help the student learn the words and that they can also apply to their other courses.  From our experiences, this information about learning is often missing from classes that focus on improving reading skills.  Also, the practice exercises progress from basic recall through the application level of learning.

Pabis, D. & Hamer, A. (2014). Building College Vocabulary Strategies (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NY: Pearson. ISBN: 978-0-321-84425-5
This vocabulary textbook is at approximately the eleventh through thirteenth grade level and is for use in a higher level developmental reading course.  Compared to the Basic College Vocabulary Strategies it has more in-depth information about how learning happens as well as more intensive strategies.

 

Table #5
Lang, J. M. (2016). Small teaching: Everyday lessons from the science of learning. (1st ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, a Wiley Brand.
Employ cognitive theory to facilitate better student learning. In Small Teaching, James Lang presents strategies for improving student learning that can be put into practice in a single class period. These strategies are designed to bridge the chasm between primary research and the classroom environment in a way that can be implemented by any faculty in any discipline, and successfully integrated into existing teaching techniques. Learn, for example: * How does one become good at retrieving knowledge from memory? * How does making predictions now help us learn in the future? * How do instructors instill fixed or growth mindsets in their students? Each chapter introduces a basic concept in cognitive theory, explains when and how it should be employed, and provides firm examples of how the intervention has been or could be used in a variety of disciplines. Small teaching techniques include brief classroom or online learning activities, one-time interventions, and small modifications in course design or communication with students


Table #6
Trammell, J., & Terrell, G. (2016). The 4th Branch of Government: We the People. Richmond: Brandylane Publishing
The 4th Branch of Government is a call to educate citizens and young people to recognize the tools at their disposal to make our democracy work more effectively for everyone.  Stressing the importance of education and awareness, this book is a guide for the 21st century citizen to be involved and to know more about their own government and how it works.

 

Table #7
Hazard, L. & Carter, S. (2016). Your Freshman Is Off to College: A Month-by-Month Guide to The First-Year. Providence, RI: CreateSpace.
Higher education officials and parents of new college students struggle with the extent to which parents should be involved in the college experience, particularly during the first year. While research on helicopter parenting suggests parents should back off, other evidence concludes that students are more successful with parental support. In fact, lack of family support creates barriers to college completion. Some universities enlist parents while others view collaborating with parents as caving to their demands. This book offers a month-by month guide to help parents understand how to support their young adults from a healthy distance. 

Hazard, L. & Nadeau, J.P. (2012). Foundations for Learning: Claiming Your Education. Boston, MA: Pearson Education.
Foundations for Learning addresses both the attitudinal variables and personality traits that affect college achievement like locus of control, conceptions of intelligence, and intellectual curiosity in relation to specific study-related behaviors such as text annotation and active listening. At its core, this text is based on the psychology of adjustment. Students are pushed to consider how each mindset, perception, and attitude connects with their skill sets, and how one influences the other.  The text encourages students to use this insight to make the necessary adjustments to their new role as college students.


Thursday November 2, 2017 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Allegheny Foyer

6:00pm

Exhibitors Reception (Open to All)
Thursday November 2, 2017 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Allegheny Foyer

6:30pm

Molly's Trolleys Tour
Ticket required. Space is limited to 29 people. Sign up using the conference registration process. If space available, sign up at the registration desk at the conference. Cost=$26

Itinerary:
6:15 pm Meet in the Westin Lobby
6:30 pm Board the Trolley and depart
8:00 pm Drop off at Market Square for dinner on your own or return to the Westin

Molly’s Trolleys fleet of vehicles includes 1920's style trolleys that are fully enclosed, air-conditioned, heated and are handicapped accessible. They have panoramic windows, gorgeous interior woodwork, and brass railings with comfortable, bench-style seating.

This tour lets you experience Pittsburgh with a fully-narrated historical tour of the city. The tour highlights Pittsburgh's magnificent array of architecture, rivers and historic landmarks, and it showcases interesting facts about the people, places and culture of the city. The tour includes Downtown, the Cultural District, the North Side, and a one-way ride on the historic Duquesne Incline. As you return to the Westin, you can be dropped off at Market Square for dinner on your own or back at the hotel. Market Square is a short walk from the Westin. Cost of dinner on your own is not included.

Thursday November 2, 2017 6:30pm - 9:00pm
Molly's Trolleys 125 W Station Square Dr, Pittsburgh, PA 15219

6:30pm

Wigle Whiskey Tour
Ticket required. Space is limited to 29 people. Sign up using the conference registration process. If space available, sign up at the registration desk. Cost= $25 (Does not include cost of dinner)

Registration Itinerary:
6:15 pm Meet in Westin lobby
6:30 pm Depart Westin and walk to Wigle Whiskey (15-20 minute walk)
6:45 pm Arrive at Wigle Whiskey
7:00 pm Tour
8:30 pm Walk back to Westin with optional stop for dinner American whiskey was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Throughout the 1700 and 1800s, Western Pennsylvania was the epicenter of American Whiskey production. Wigle is named for one of those pioneering Pennsylvania distillers. In the 1790s, Phillip Wigle defended his right to distill in a tussle with a tax collector, and unwittingly helped spark the Whiskey Rebellion, which pitted Western Pennsylvania distillers against George Washington's troops.

The tour includes a cocktail to start, a hands on tour of the distillation process, a history of the Whiskey Rebellion told through the eyes of the company’s namesake, Philip Wigle, and a seated tasting of straight spirits. Throughout the tour they will regale you with the true tale of the Pittsburgh's Whiskey Rebellion, one of the country's quirkiest and pivotal events.

Thursday November 2, 2017 6:30pm - 9:00pm
Wigle Whiskey 1055 Spring Garden Ave, Pittsburgh PA 15212

8:30pm

Hospitality Room
Thursday November 2, 2017 8:30pm - 10:30pm
Washington
 
Friday, November 3
 

7:00am

Exhibitors' Breakfast (Open to All)
Friday November 3, 2017 7:00am - 8:00am
Allegheny Foyer

7:00am

Exhibit hall opens
Friday November 3, 2017 7:00am - 2:00pm
Allegheny Foyer

7:30am

Session Chairs' Orientation
Session Chairs introduce presenters and distribute and collect evaluation forms from session attendees. Session Chair Orientation is held each morning for assignments. Benefits include a guaranteed seat at the session you're chairing and an opportunity to serve the association while getting to know the presenters and CRLA colleagues

Friday November 3, 2017 7:30am - 8:00am
Lawrence

7:30am

LACM SIG Breakfast
Friday November 3, 2017 7:30am - 8:30am
Crawford East

7:30am

Registration
Friday November 3, 2017 7:30am - 3:00pm
Allegheny Foyer

8:00am

Raffle Ticket Sales
Friday November 3, 2017 8:00am - 4:30pm
Allegheny Foyer

8:30am

9:45am

Game-based Learning: Bridging Contextualities, Emerging Modes
This session will be fun and games! Participants will have access to and play a prototype unique to the field of college reading and learning. Presenters will review the theoretical underpinnings of the game, the collaboration required for game-based learning, and the future consideration of gaming’s role in higher education.

Time during this session will be spent by participants playing reading and study strategy games. Also, this presentation will explain the theoretical underpinnings of the game content and design and explore specifically how theory helped create content. Presenters will review this mode as a learning tool, the process of creating such a prototype, and the multiple entities involved in the design and execution of the games.
Overview:
1. Game play
2. Discussion of theory that informed design
3. Creating across multiple contexts
a. Project management
b. Execution of methodology
4. Looking forward: Implications in college literacy
5. Questions



Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Washington

9:45am

Missions and Toolkits: A Study of Reading in Writing Centers
This Research Report shares data and analysis from a multi-site, mixed-methods study of reading pedagogy in writing centers. Through a national survey, interviews, and observations this study explores 1) the extent to which writing centers embrace reading instruction and 2) the range of strategies currently in use for reading instruction.

The researcher will 1) summarize relevant background, theory, and pedagogy in order to help the audience understand motives behind the study, 2) quickly trace the research methodology, 3) share qualitative and quantitative data, 3) invite audience members to pose questions, and 4) facilitate a collective discussion of survey results, significance, and applications.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Westmoreland East

9:45am

Bridging Over Trenches: Reading Strategies To Fire Up Student Engagement
Many students struggle to read at a college level. I developed three reading strategies that bolstered student engagement and intrinsic motivation. Students connected with the material in many ways and discovered that some of the best learning happens when it is in motion. Let’s FIRE UP students to read!

Students must get out of their seats; movement heightens engagement. I will use a similar method in my presentation. First, I will frontload three different reading strategies. Next, I will ask the roundtable to use the strategies to complete a variety of exercises. Once, the conference members complete the drill, we will engage in a discussion based on the activity. These procedures will emulate how I use these reading strategies in my classroom. Lastly, I will also lead a discussion about how students may use the aforementioned strategies while preparing for class on their own.

Moderators

Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Allegheny Grand II

9:45am

CRP in Reading Instruction for the Linguistically Diverse Learner
Linguistically Diverse students (LDs) often have difficulty comprehending college-level texts for several reasons, unfamiliarity with the language, vocabulary, and content. Presenting college level reading information to LDs assumes that the instruction is culturally relevant. These students face academic challenges when they read text outside of their native language.

This will be presented through a round-table, hands-activities, and a workshop style presentation.

Moderators
Speakers

CRP ppt

Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Butler East

9:45am

Micro-learning: Supporting Students on Academic Probation
Students on Academic Probation often are lacking appropriate strategies to manage themselves, their time and their academic responsibilities. A micro-learning approach of introducing timely success strategies, during weekly monitoring sessions, can empower students to meet their academic responsibilities more effectively.

This will be delivered as power point presentation with opportunity for questions and discussion.

Moderators

Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Pennsylvania East

9:45am

Bridging the Cognitive & Non-Cognitive: Academic Probation and Student Success
Research demonstrates the bridge between non-cognitive/affective elements and cognitive functions such as memory, learning, and production. Students, learning professionals, and instructors need to understand and leverage these connections for student success, specifically in academic probation and related courses. This hands-on session will present research and provide activities for classroom implementation.

This interactive, research-based presentation will discuss the characteristics of successful probation programs and include hands-on activities that attendees can implement in their own course work.

Neuroplasticity:

https://youtu.be/ELpfYCZa87g

 

Perception:

https://youtu.be/K3hAVT2sDqQ



Moderators
Speakers


Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Somerset East

9:45am

Professional Development and Doctoral Study in Developmental Education
Developmental education has advanced in research, scholarship, and professional development opportunities. This session will cover the largest professional association in developmental education and doctoral study opportunities. Information on the Sam Houston State fully online doctoral program in Developmental Education Administration and the National Association for Developmental Education will be offered

Moderators
Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Crawford East

9:45am

The Tutoring and Learning Center in the 21st Century
What the Teaching and Learning Center is at the University for FACULTY, The Tutoring and Learning Center is at the Community College for STUDENTS. This presentation will highlight what the 21st Century Tutoring and Learning Center is--and the holistic, data-driven, and indispensable practices that make it a student development repository.

Moderators

Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Westmoreland Central

9:45am

Flex Your Learning with Mastery Based Algebra
Many students stress about the algebra class they have to take. Plus, they want more choice on how they take it. Using Aleks learning technology in a mastery based flex learning algebra class allows students both choice in delivery and an environment that puts the math anxious more at ease.

Allison Bonner will use a power point presentation, plus lead the participants in a guided exercise to develop a possible flex learning lesson plan for their own course. The attendees will also be able to engage in a lively discussion about using this type of course for their own students.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Armstrong

9:45am

Investigating Students’ Attitudes in an Emporium-Designed Developmental Math Course
This presentation explores students’ pre- and post-attitudes towards an Emporium-designed developmental math course; the relationship between students’ attitudes and performance; and the effect of gender on performance and attitude. Results indicate a significant difference in some elements of attitude. However, there is no significant relationship between post-attitude and performance.

The delivery method will be a power-point presentation. The presenter will distribute handouts to the session attendees. The researcher will encourage the conference attendees to reflect on their instructional practices, especially using Emporium model and exchange valuable information about how positive attitudes may benefit better learning outcome.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Somerset West

9:45am

Using Co-requisite Math Courses As Accelerated On-ramps
After years of developmental education redesign, one community college utilized institutional data, research, and pedagogical teaching and learning experiences to create a unique “on ramp” opportunity for under-prepared students. Come learn how this innovative curricular design including co-requisites, cohorts, contextualization, and embedded tutors has led to greater student success.

This presentation will use video, PowerPoint, and handouts to engage participants in understanding the inner workings of our program. Institutional data used to drive curricular decisions, developmental redesign models and results data, new program components and design, pragmatic classroom tools, and new program results data will be shared. The audience will be engaged during a question and answer portion at the end of the presentation.

Moderators
Speakers


Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Butler West

9:45am

Campus Climate and its Impact on Student Engagement
This presentation provides participants with preliminary data on how derogatory rhetoric following the 2016 presidential election impacted a university in the Southwest. The discussion portion of our roundtable invites attendees to examine the climate of their institutions and how leaders of postsecondary institutions can foster inclusive diversity.

In the first 30 minutes of the roundtable discussion, the presenters will provide a brief presentation to showcase our review of literature, methodology, and findings. They will also provide attendees with qualitative data, such as student responses and artifacts we collected from our preliminary research. Implications and conclusions will be presented for attendees. The discussion portion of our roundtable presentation invites attendees to examine the current cultural climate of their institutions and how we, as leaders of postsecondary institutions, can incorporate politics, diversity, and culture into the classroom in a positive way.


Moderators
Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Allegheny Grand II

9:45am

Developing Professionals: A Study of Tutoring as a Transferrable Skill
This presentation describes the distinct and lasting benefit of working in a community college learning center through presenting findings from a qualitative study exploring the impact of working as a tutor on professionals who were formerly tutors.

For this presentation, we will first explain the study and the findings, which will include former tutors’ recommendations for how supervisors can best support tutors’ development into professionals. Next, the audience will have the opportunity to discuss the methods by which they, as supervisors, can best support their tutors as they transition to professional roles. Additionally, the presenters will discuss the implications of the focus on transition to professional positions including recruitment, retention, and training.

Moderators
Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Cambria West

9:45am

Welcome to the future: Navigating the new, online IMTPC process!
This informal session is intended as an introduction to the new online application for the CRLA’s International Mentor Training Program Certification (IMTPC). Participants will learn about new IMTPC requirements, interact with the new system, and discuss ways to transition their existing certification materials to the online process.

The focus of the session will be on the new online application system and how participants can navigate the new requirements and format. As the round-table format inherently invites lively discussion, the IMTPC Coordinator and Assistant Coordinator will foster participant dialogue surrounding the reasons for modernizing the IMTPC process for better accessibility, convenience, and utility. The facilitators will then present an overview of the new online system, highlighting new features such as saving work in progress, direct upload of documents, and structured response prompts for greater user-utility.

Moderators
Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Allegheny Grand II

9:45am

Bridging Innovative Qualitative Inquiry with Digital Data Management and Analysis
Computer-assisted qualitative data analysis software (CAQDAS) offers effective digital platforms for managing and analyzing data. However, technology is only as good as the inquiries asked of it. Presenters will discuss research question and design considerations to inform appropriate use of software to bridge development of innovative and efficient research methods.

The session will begin with a presentation of foundational information to support initial understandings of CAQDAS. In tandem with the presentation of the basics, presenters will provide examples (screenshots and modeling of functions) of current projects to clarify concepts. Once the basic functionality has been demonstrated, the session will shift to a discussion of the importance of research question and design alignment for use of CAQDAS. Finally, time will be allotted for work in partners or groups to craft research questions followed by whole group discussions of how CAQDAS can facilitate answers to those questions.

Moderators
Speakers
JL

Jodi Lampi

Northern Illinois University,Academic Literacy andLearning


Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Fayette

9:45am

Bridging Research and Data: Our Journey of Creating an IRW
Creating an integrated reading and writing course sounds like a straightforward process, right? Come learn about our journey to create bridges across departments and to create an IRW course to improve developmental students’ success.

This roundtable will use small group discussion to find out what the participants’ needs are and to share the process used to develop, create, and implement the IRW course at our institution. Sample assignments and assessments will also be shared to help the audience understand what the course expectations are. In addition, informal groups and think-pair-share strategies will be utilized to ensure audience engagement and participation.

Moderators
Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Lawrence

9:45am

College Students with Mental Illness and the Developmental Education Community
This session addresses how college students with mental illness are part of the DE community. Little research explores mental illness in students despite the rising number reporting mental health concerns. Come learn about mental illness in academia and why we should broaden our conception of DE to include this population.

Current data about college student mental illness will be disseminated alongside the literature about this population. DE theory will be discussed to bridge the gap between DE and college students with mental illness. Afterwards, the floor will be opened for discussion of why these students belong as part of the DE community as well as participant experience in working with college students with mental illness to facilitate dialogue about how reconceptualizing DE in this way requires attention to the supports we can provide college students with mental illness

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Westmoreland West

9:45am

What GPAs Don't Say: Qualitative Evaluation of Supplemental Instruction
When assessing Supplemental Instruction, it's common practice to use GPA as an indicator of efficacy. This presentation discusses how quantitative GPA analysis gives a skewed representation of effectiveness and how qualitative survey analysis can provide a much clearer and accurate picture of how well a program is working.

This session will be presented lecture style with room for questions and answer throughout and at the end.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Allegheny Grand II

9:45am

Change: The impact of a summer literacy program on student-athletes
This study looks at the changing perception of literacy and building connections between the multiple literacies in which freshman football student-athletes do and will participate in at the college level. Data was collected during a summer literacy program created by the researcher and taught by the athletic department learning specialist.

The presentation will include the background of the study, analysis of the data, and the final results. Second, the implications for incoming freshman football student-athletes will be discussed along with how the results were used to modify the current literacy program that is currently in the follow-up stages. Lastly, the presentation will conclude with how this data can help rethink summer bridge programs for football student-athletes. The presentation will include a PowerPoint, video and will be 40 minutes long with 20 minutes available for questions. Handouts will be provided.

Moderators
Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 10:45am
Cambria East

9:45am

Bridging Policies Across the Nation: A 50-State Snapshot
Developmental education (DE) has been a controversial topic on the national educational policy stage. Researchers interviewed state leaders and members of state coordinating boards and then searched published documents, reports, and state statutes to verify current DE policies for all 50 states. The presenters will highlight nationwide reforms and trends.

Presenters will present PowerPoint presentation to discuss national policy trends using color-coded maps and handouts.


Friday November 3, 2017 9:45am - 11:15am
Pennsylvania West

11:00am

Building Bridges through Accelerated Learning Literacy Workshops
This session shares the rationale, framework, and results for UTEP's workshops. The first two workshops are designed for Adult Basic Education students so they can place into developmental English or higher. Workshop three is designed for Developmental students who almost pass the placement test so they can be college ready.

The presenter will give a PowerPoint presentation over the three workshops and have handouts available that summarize the information given in the presentation. Audience members will be asked to share the accelerated learning models that they use at their institutions. Audience members will be given an exercise in which they brainstorm with fellow audience members on ways in which accelerated learning could be used in their own programs.

Moderators

Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Somerset East

11:00am

Using ACTOR to Enhance Efficient Reading
The presenters will discuss the procedures and results of their research on using ACTOR in teaching developmental reading. They will engage the participants as they demonstrate this method that is intended to help students to become better readers. Participants will be invited to reflect on the use of ACTOR.

The presenters will use PowerPoint in demonstrating the steps with accompanying strategies in ACTOR. They will also explain procedures that they followed in conducting their research on the use of ACTOR. They will present the results of the study and conclusions. In addition, they will show sample students’ responses to the open ended questions that were included in the survey. They will also engage the audience to ask questions and explore the possibility of using ACTOR in teaching reading across educational levels. The presenters will distribute handouts that detail the steps and strategies and sample activities in ACTOR.

Moderators
Speakers


Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Washington

11:00am

Using Multiple Texts to Teach Critical Reading Skills
Mastery of developmental reading courses offers both an opportunity for academic enrichment and a barrier to college completion. The use of mutiple texts as oppose to the one size-fits-all approach may not be an effective pedagogical practice by instructors who teach the LD student.

The presentation will be introduced using a PowerPoint presentation of the research. It will highlight key findings and integrate a hands-on activity for audience participation, followed by a closing discussion on the use of multiple texts.

Moderators
Speakers


Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Allegheny Grand II

11:00am

Building a Bridge for Technical Programs: Writing for the Professions
“Writing for the Professions” is a course for technical-program students that contextualizes writing toward career-based genres. It is an English Composition I alternative for A.A.S./Certificate Degree students that fosters success by bridging the gap between academic and real-world writing. Topics include course description, learning objectives, and comparison with English Composition.

The roundtable delivery method of a 30-minute presentation followed by a 30-minute focused small-group discussion is perfect for our topic. We expect our innovative Writing for the Professions course with contextualized career-based writing for technical-program students (in lieu of English Composition I) to excite participants and generate much fruitful discussion

Moderators
Speakers


Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Allegheny Grand II

11:00am

Course Design Principles for Integrating Reading into Writing Programs
This session will focus on research-based principles for integrating reading strategies into all levels of a writing program. Attendees will explore effective teaching practices for designing courses, writing assignments, and related learning activities that help students strengthen critical reading skills and make a successful transition to college-level source-based writing.

The session will be organized into four sections: 1) a short introduction to research-based principles for integrating reading into writing courses, 2) an overview of an award-winning model writing program curriculum that incorporates reading instruction and writing about reading into each level of a college writing program from developmental education to sophomore writing, 3) examples of reading-based writing assignments and related learning activities at each course level in a writing program, and 4) a facilitated discussion with attendees about strategies for applying concepts from the presentation to participants’ own courses and programs.

Moderators
Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Somerset West

11:00am

Feedback Strategies That Work
College instructors vary widely in the amount of feedback they provide on student writing. Some cover papers with red ink and long comments; others mark very minimally. In this interactive session, we will consider relevant research and discuss together the feedback strategies that most help and hinder students’ further improvement.

Presentation of relevant research and learning principles followed by interactive discussion with participants.


Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Pennsylvania West

11:00am

Academic Coaching in STEM
This presentation will give an overview of academic coaching in STEM. We will discuss how STEM coaching is different than tutoring and show videos of STEM focused academic coaching sessions.

The delivery of the presentation will be via PowerPoint, along with video demonstrations of STEM coaching strategies. Audience engagement will include demonstration of session activities and a question and answer session.


Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Fayette

11:00am

Embedded Tutoring: A Bridge to Sustained Success and Student Retention
Embedded tutoring is a new program at our institution partnering tutors and faculty for in-class support. The length and frequency of each visit are personalized based upon the needs of the course. This session will explore three current models and will provide details on our implementation process and long-term plans.

The presenters will open with some background information and discussion about the challenges learning center professionals are facing and how we came to explore embedded tutoring at our institution. We will review our pilot process, the expansions since, all current assessment data, and briefly introduce the most valuable references we used before opening the conversation back up to the whole group. We will utilize PowerPoint for visuals and provide a handout with some of the key information.

Moderators
Speakers


Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Butler West

11:00am

SOARing to Success: Using SOAR to guide transition and growth
This presentation outlines the SOAR planning model as an alternative to SWOT analysis, and how this model was adopted to guide a center's transition. SOAR was utilized to plan yearly goals and engage student staff. Participants will be invited to think about how they might use SOAR in their centers.

This presentation will include a brief lecture and will lead into a group activity to have attendees practice with the model, followed by large-group discussion.




Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Westmoreland East

11:00am

Working with Faculty to Create an Effective Math Lab
The previous structure of the math lab ignored faculty needs and expectations, but through communication with the Mathematics Department, the math lab created a structure that would be beneficial to both faculty and students.

The session will be delivered by a slide presentation including testimonials from faculty, staff, students, and tutors and will offer a variety of ideas and challenges faced during the development and implementation process of the new structure. Before beginning the presentation, they presenters will ask the participants to fill out a brief survey pertaining to topics discussed throughout the presentation. On the survey, they will also have the participants list possible challenges or successes they might currently be facing. The goal is to answer those possible challenges and comment on successful practices in the presentation and discussion with other participants.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Armstrong

11:00am

Building Cross-Campus Partnerships through Peer Education
The University of Cincinnati created the Peer Education Network (PEN) to bring together several offices employing Peer Educators. This session will discuss the creation and goals of PEN as well as improvements to the Peer Educator experience. Attendees will leave with an understanding of how to implement a similar initiative.

The session will primarily consist of a presentation, which will include an overview of the Peer Education Network, relevant data and assessments, future directions, and recommendations for creating a PEN at the audience members' institution. Audience members will receive handouts outlining the PEN creation timeline. Examples of training modules will also be shown. Time will be given for participants to identify relevant offices for partnership and to brainstorm ways to address challenges specific to their institution.

Moderators

Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Cambria East

11:00am

Discussion on Treasurer's Duties for SRC Current and Future Leaders
This is an opportunity to network and learn from current and past treasurer's of CRLA. Regional and State treasurers, both current, past, and possible future members who are interested in discussing budget management, reports, availability of funds, and general tips on managing records will be discussed.


Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Crawford East

11:00am

Embedded Learning Assistance: A Viable Alternative to Traditional SI
An Embedded Learning Assistance program was piloted from Fall 2014—Fall 2016 to support a high-risk, 100-level Practical Statistics course with a historical failure rate of 25%. As a result of this program, failure rates dropped to a record low of 10% and students were more engaged during class.

This session will be delivered through an interactive PowerPoint presentation and discussion, and supported with informational and practical handouts for participants. The informational handout will briefly summarize key facets of the Embedded Learning Assistance program described in the present study. The practical handout will prompt participants to reflect on high-risk courses at their own institutions, and to consider what resources they would require to implement a similar program. There will also be time for interactive discussion of the results, study implications and limitations, and implementation suggestions.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Westmoreland West

11:00am

Celebrating the Legacy of CRLA Through Oral History
This presentation presents the first oral histories in the CRLA Oral History Project that preserve the professional knowledge and unique understandings-insights developed by a generation of reading professionals who are reaching or have reached retirement age after serving in the field and our association across the past 40 years.

The content of the 60 minute research report will be delivered through symposium format and supplemented with posters highlighting the findings of each of the four oral histories. The posters will then be placed out in the registration area for review by conference attendees across the duration of the conference.  Individuals will be recruited to serve as oral historians for future endeavors.


Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Westmoreland Central

11:00am

College Literacy and Learning SIG-ILA: teaching, service and scholarship
This session provides an opportunity for literacy conversations and available resources for those involved with college students’ literacy and learning programs. Members from the College Literacy & Learning Special Interest Group of the International Literacy Association will discuss teaching, scholarship, and service projects for professional development.

Small group discussion will include a variety of topics including the dichotomy of content area literacy versus disciplinary literacy (Shanahan & Shanahan, 2012), innovative teaching practices, the effectiveness of critical literacy, and other concerns and issues presented within individual programs and classrooms. Lastly, opportunities for professional development including service and scholarship will be followed by questions.

Moderators
Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Lawrence

11:00am

Growing the Academic Coaching Research Base: Findings from Two Studies
Academic coaching is a form of academic support quickly gaining prominence, yet the empirical research base for assessing its effectiveness remains relatively small. To help bridge the gap between research and practice, this session will present findings from two major studies into academic coaching.

The research report will be conducted primarily in the format of a digital presentation with an emphasis on data visualization through charts and graphs. A brief research summary in hard copy format will also be distributed to session attendees. All attendees will be encouraged to ask questions as well as share experiences and ideas.

Moderators
Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Pennsylvania East

11:00am

Combining Metacognition and Occupational Therapy Theory in Assistive Learning Environments
When combining Occupational Therapy’s most commonly used theoretical frame of reference, the Model of Human Occupation, and metacognitive learning strategies in a higher education assistive learning environment, students are encouraged to engage in a process of self-assessment. Using OT theory can take the guesswork out of motivating your students.

This session will be composed of a PowerPoint presentation or Prezi projected throughout the session, several handouts for reference, and activities which promote audience interaction and participation. A set amount of time at the end of the session will be allotted for questions from the audience. We want the audience to leave with practical applications of our theory.



Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Butler East

11:00am

CRLA and N4A: Bridging Two Organizations
The National Association of Academic Advisors for Athletics (N4A) provides professional development opportunities within the Student Athlete Academic Support Services field. For members, specifically of the Learning Concerns and Enhancement Committee, collaboration with CRLA could prove very beneficial. This facilitated discussion is designed to explore partnership opportunities within the organizations.

This presentation will follow the roundtable format. There will be a 30-minute presentation that will provided an overview of N4A LCEC Committee and the CRLA Student Athlete Special Interest Group. This will be followed by round table discussion. The audience will be engaged by interacting with other participants by answering a series of questions aimed at brainstorming ways to create meaningful programmatic efforts from both organizations. These efforts are aimed at creating valuable professional development opportunities for members of both organizations

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Allegheny Grand II

11:00am

Bridging Academic Literacy and English 101: Online Course Development Reflections
Have you considered revamping your online course to meet Quality Matters standards but are reluctant because you aren’t sure all that it entails? English and Academic Literacy (ACLT) faculty reflect on developing the fully online version of ALP, which is a co-requisite model of ACLT 053 and ENGL 101.

The presentation will be grounded in the conceptual framework so that attendees have background information that is cemented in research. Afterwards, the presenters will provide a practical view of their experiences through a reflective presentation of their process working through building these courses via an online format. Finally, they plan to incorporate an interactive session at the end, where participants will work with each other to address areas where they can build online courses to meet the needs of their student populations. The presentation will be conducted in a PPT format.


Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Cambria West

11:00am

Lessons learned while writing my eText
Providing current instructional resources for students, especially in technology-based courses challenges instructors to keep pace with Moore’s Law; it is like balancing an elephant on a razor blade.

Whether it is a report, a presentation, a newsletter, a personal story, a photo album, or a visual trip report, there is virtually no limit on what you can express creatively with Sway. If you are building a presentation dependent on imagery including a lot of online content or if your audience will be guiding themselves through the presentation, Sway is probably going to work better for you.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Allegheny Grand II

12:15pm

Lunch with a Mentor - Bridging to Digital Textbooks

Topic:  
Bridging to eTexts

Description:
Discussion will focus on .pdfs, eTexts, eBooks, online OER (OpenEducation Resources) digital books. What are faculty and studentexperiences with eTexts? What if students could have their textbooksthe first day of class. Handouts will be provided as well as an onlineinteractive wiki site of resources.


Moderators

Friday November 3, 2017 12:15pm - 1:45pm
Allegheny Grand II

12:15pm

Lunch with a Mentor - Building Bridges from Research Idea to Research Study: Forming a Problem Statement

Topic:  
Building Bridges from Research Idea to Research Study: Forming a Problem Statement

Description:  
You’ve got an idea for a research study – so, what’s the next step? Wewill discuss a specific kind of problem statement, how to construct it,and how it is useful in articulating research goals and approaches whenplanning a study. We will work through the problem statement process,and if you bring your research ideas we will workshop those as problemstatements as well. Geared toward early career scholars and graduatestudents and anyone else interested.


Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 12:15pm - 1:45pm
Allegheny Grand II

12:15pm

Lunch with a Mentor - Empowering Student Leadership in Academic Support Programs

Topic:  
Empowering Student Leadership in Academic Support Programs

Description:  
As many professionals in academic support across the nation struggleto serve the demands of a growing student body with limitedprofessional staff members, our table will examine the definite prosand potential pitfalls of empowering student leadership in learningassistance center programs. Engage in a discussion geared towardgetting participants to think outside of the traditional supervisory box interms of undergraduate and graduate student responsibilities,particularly within the framework of a Supplemental Instruction ortutoring program.


Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 12:15pm - 1:45pm
Allegheny Grand II

12:15pm

Lunch with a Mentor - Finding your Academic Voice

Topic: 
Finding your Academic Voice

Description:  
Being a fairly new academic can be very challenging, as most new rolescome with hidden curriculum and expectations. Whether you are agraduate student, practitioner new to the research arena, or a juniorfaculty member, come engage in a discussion related to finding yourvoice in new settings, navigating new academic roles, networking, andpublishing. I will provide a list of journal outlets intended for newvoices, graduate students, and emerging scholars. In addition, we willdiscuss networking strategies, department collaborations, and"practice-to-research" ideas.


Moderators
JL

Jodi Lampi

Northern Illinois University,Academic Literacy andLearning

Friday November 3, 2017 12:15pm - 1:45pm
Allegheny Grand II

12:15pm

Lunch with a Mentor - How to get the most out of a mentoring relationship?

Topic:
How to get the most out of a mentoring relationship?

Description:  
In this discussion, we will examine current mentorship research,including relationship cultivation, personal development, andprofessional growth. This discussion will be an opportunity to appreciatethe concepts surrounding mentorship, its importance to individuals andit's vitality in the further development of individuals and industry acrossall fields and across campuses.


Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 12:15pm - 1:45pm
Allegheny Grand II

12:15pm

Lunch with a Mentor - Intersecting Writing Programs: Fostering Positive Relationships Across WAC, Writing Centers, and First-Year Writing

Topic: 
Intersecting Writing Programs: Fostering Positive RelationshipsAcross WAC, Writing Centers, and First-Year Writing

Description:
Come prepared to share your stories of successful writing partnershipson your campus. You are welcome to ask questions and brainstormstrategies to bring back to your campus and classrooms. Ultimately,leave our time together with a stronger sense of how programs canwork together to strengthen campus-wide writing initiatives.


Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 12:15pm - 1:45pm
Allegheny Grand II

12:15pm

Lunch with a Mentor - Reaching Across the Quad: Campus Collaboration Ideas for College Reading and Learning Professionals

Topic:
Reaching Across the Quad: Campus Collaboration Ideas for CollegeReading and Learning Professionals

Description:
Busy schedules and campus silos can sometimes make our work lonelyand isolating. However, there are countless opportunities—andneeds—for college reading and learning professionals to collaborateand educate others across campus. During lunch, we will share possiblepartnership ideas, both tried and true and unchartered territory. Wewill discuss suggestions for initiating and sustaining these collaborationsso that they are mutually beneficial.


Moderators
SA

Sonya Armstrong

Texas State University

Friday November 3, 2017 12:15pm - 1:45pm
Allegheny Grand II

12:15pm

Lunch with a Mentor - Reading Strategies to Support Learning in Multiple Texts

Topic:  
Reading Strategies to Support Learning in Multiple Texts

Description:
This session is an extension from previous presentations onincorporating reading into the math curriculum. I will be sharingsuggestions and ways to integrate reading strategies into a variety ofdisciplines. This will include vocabulary strategies, comprehensionstrategies and others. Bring your own suggestions to share witheveryone at the table.


Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 12:15pm - 1:45pm
Allegheny Grand II

12:15pm

Lunch with a Mentor - Research on Tutoring: The Year in Review

Topic:  
Research on Tutoring: The Year in Review

Description:
Learning assistance professionals rarely have time to keep up withcurrent research in their field. This is particularly true of the research oncollege and university tutoring. This discussion addresses findings frommajor research students on tutoring conducted between November of2016 and October of 2017. The discussion leader, Hunter Boylan, willprovide an annotated bibliography of some of the more relevantresearch on college and university tutoring. Participants will then raisequestions and participate in a discussion of the implications of thisresearch for practice.


Moderators
HB

Hunter Boylan

Chemeketa CommunityCollege

Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 12:15pm - 1:45pm
Allegheny Grand II

12:15pm

Lunch with a Mentor - Scaffolding for Reading and Writing Based Projects

Topic:
Scaffolding for Reading and Writing Based Projects

Description:
Come prepared to share your reading/writing activities which haveproven successful for your developmental students. Engage in adiscussion of a scaffolding approach to reading, writing, and studystrategies culminating in an exciting project that utilizes technology andstudents’ creativity in producing reading/writing strategies which areunique and publishable on YouTube or the Internet. Leave withexamples of student generated projects, technology resources, andideas on how to implement these new ideas in your classroom. We willall finish lunch as a “community of educators!”


Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 12:15pm - 1:45pm
Allegheny Grand II

12:15pm

Lunch with a Mentor - Small Teaching for College Reading and Learning

Topic:
Lunch & Conversation With Jim Lang, Small Teaching for College Reading and Learning

Description:
The learning principles outlined in Small Teaching represent core cognitive activities that should help learners succeed in a variety of areas, but some may be more helpful than others in the specific work that learning professionals do with their students, such as one-on-one tutoring or mentoring.  In this conversation, we’ll consider which of the Small Teaching principles have proven most effective for working with students in academic support or tutoring contexts, and how we can best put those principles in practice in such environments.  Participants should come prepared to share their best small teaching practices with one another and the group.


Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 12:15pm - 1:45pm
Allegheny Grand II

12:15pm

Lunch with a Mentor - Tutor Training: How do you know it is working? (Standards,Outcomes, Assessment and evaluation for tutor training)

Topic:
Tutor Training: How do you know it is working? (Standards,Outcomes, Assessment and evaluation for tutor training)


Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 12:15pm - 1:45pm
Allegheny Grand II

2:00pm

Steel Is Malleable under Suitable Conditions: A Solid Achievement Model
Steel is an excellent material for bridges because of its strength and flexibility. Building a bridge requires enormous collaboration. This context provides the framework of the figurative bridges between theory and practice, IRW curriculum and a learning center, and professional development resulting in enormous faculty growth and documented student achievement.

Dual themes of community and collaboration are highlighted within professional collegial circles, classrooms, and extend out to our learning center. A slide show illustrates initial redesign efforts concomitant with a seismic shift of culture through purposeful change: an intentional move to a constructivist andragogy and inception of a learning center from the ground up. Our findings represent varied perspectives: a first-generation co-author of IRW redesign and PD model; a second-generation faculty member/mentor; coordinator of the learning center and fourth-generation participant/mentor; and lastly, student perspectives via video. An ample bibliography is provided, along with a guide to assess participant’s institutional considerations.



Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Cambria East

2:00pm

Bridge Over Troubled Waters: Using Reading Apprenticeship for College Readiness
Motivating content area faculty to overcome the “it’s not my job” outlook and incorporate reading best practices into their college courses is essential. We will share how one small community college motivated faculty to make reading a priority and show ways that its students have demonstrated success.

This session will be a mixture of presentation and hands-on activities. We will use a portion of the time to talk about the Reading Apprenticeship methods that we have found most helpful, and we will also give participants an opportunity to try them out.

Moderators
Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Somerset East

2:00pm

No Reading Strategy Left Behind: Reading Strategies in Writing Classes
When students master these strategies: previewing, highlighting, annotating/ writing marginal notes, they become strong and independent readers. These strategies help students to navigate rigorous academic texts. During our session, we will review current research, discuss how the strategies enhance integrated courses, and practice the strategies using texts from various disciplines.

Participants of this session will review research, discuss how the strategies may be used in writing classes, and practice each strategy using an article from a content level textbook.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Allegheny Grand II

2:00pm

Using Young Adult Literature in the Developmental Writing Classroom
Using young adult (YA) literature in a developmental classroom helps our students better respond to readings and supports the learning goals in most developmental writing classrooms. YA books also help connect students to our writing assignments and their writing goals, while giving them relatable and accessible readings.

The presentation will be delivered with a research presentation with audience feedback and some technology integration.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Washington

2:00pm

Maximizing Center Resources with TutorTrac Software
Accurate maintenance of learning center data is critical in today’s “technologically aware” campus. Successful service to students is required as more campuses compete for students. Students want access to their information and the ability to make appointments easily.

This presentation will include an interactive demonstration of TutorTrac software.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Crawford East

2:00pm

Maximizing Center Resources with TutorTrac Software
Accurate maintenance of learning center data is critical in today’s “technologically aware” campus. Successful service to students is required as more campuses compete for students. Students want access to their information and the ability to make appointments easily.

Our presentation will include an interactive demonstration of TutorTrac software.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Crawford East

2:00pm

Bridging the Gap Between Math Tutoring and Learning Practices
A research project was conducted in a math tutoring center. Data was collected and this data was compared to variables that positively affect student learning. Results from this study will be shared with implications for how tutoring centers can work more effectively with college math departments.

The presentation will begin with audience participation. Learning and variables that affect learning will be discussed. The presenter will discuss the variables to be studied. The audience will be asked to reflect on the variables studied. Participants will be encouraged to reflect on variables they believe have the greatest impact on leaning. The data collected and implications will be shared. There will be a discussion on how to create bridges between math departments and tutoring centers. The presenter will also share how the data was used at the College of Southern Nevada to create bridges to the math department.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Allegheny Grand II

2:00pm

Growing a Culture of Socratic Inquiry that Elevates Student Success
AHE's Socratic Tutoring session focuses on the growth of a culture of Socratic inquiry that elevates student success. Using writing, inquiry, collaboration, organization, and reading or (WICOR), this session will engage participants in a conversation about growing effective tutoring environments so all learners can participate and be successful.

Participants will be encouraged to engage in collaborative conversation and construction of tangible thought ideas and implementation practices. They will have opportunities to engage in new learning and debrief with one another on how it might be implemented at their home institutions.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Westmoreland Central

2:00pm

Peer tutoring: The bridge between knowledge banking and self-directed learning
As students enter college they are caught between the familiar -- teachers giving them information-- and the new --their need to learn independently. Peer tutoring bridges the gap between education banking and self-directed learning by introducing a facilitator in the self-directed learning process.

The delivery method for this session will consist of a half hour presentation discussing Knowles theory of self-directed learning, self-directed learning versus teacher-centered learning, and the results of my research. The second half of the session will be a discussion on how to start actively using self-directed learning as a tutoring technique and the different ways this can be enacted and how to train the peer tutors. We will also discuss what people are already doing to promote self-directed learning as part of the tutoring process.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Lawrence

2:00pm

You in the Driver Seat of Learning: Bridge to Success
Learning is a complex process. It involves building a connection among three essential components: the brain and the mind of the learner, the subject matter, and the intent of the instructor. This session engages participants in using a learning technology to connect these essentials and build a bridge to success.

This is an interactive workshop that engages participants in technology-assisted learning activities including role plays, experimentation, personal reflections, and paired and triads discussions. The presenter(s) act as facilitators of learning and seek to orchestrate learning "aha" moments.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Allegheny Grand II

2:00pm

Interdisciplinary Assessment and Development of Walk-In Tutoring Processes
This study outlines how learning support professionals can restructure processes for walk-in services by collaborating with academic departments. Learn to assess center utilization and justify costly overhead by using Lean Six Sigma analyses. Resources will be provided for participants to begin assessing and optimizing their center’s processes.

This session will be an active and engaging. With a total of 60 minutes, approximately 15 minutes will be spent introducing the team and the project using PowerPoint to illustrate our process of analysis and examples of our process maps and metrics. 15-20 minutes will be spent allowing participants to begin the Define phase by reflecting on their own programs and identifying characteristics critical to satisfying their primary goal. The remaining time will be spent showing the results of our study and addressing participants’ questions.


Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Butler West

2:00pm

Empowering Women to Increase Competence in STEM through Summer Bridge
The Academic Learners and Leaders Initiative (A.L.L.I.), offers students a smoother transition to college by immersing them in math and science while mixing in opportunities to forge those all-important early college relationships with faculty, staff, and peers. This presentation will explore the A.L.L.I. model and highlight benefits for first-year students.

This presentation will utilize PowerPoint slides with interactive content. Audience participation and discussion will be encouraged throughout the presentation. Participation will be prompted by discussion questions posted in slides throughout the presentation.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Butler East

2:00pm

How Allies Can Build Bridges for LGBTQIA Students
This interactive session focuses on an ongoing study examining the experiences of Developmental Education faculty who are allies to students who identify as LGBTQIA. Participants will collaborate with peers to navigate building bridges for students who identify as LGBTQIA and leave with resources to take back to their institutions.

The presentation will be an informed conversation. We will begin with an overview of the ongoing pilot study, showcasing the context, instrumentation, participants, and rationale. After discussing data from the pilot study, a whole group discussion about the generalizability of the results, as well as implications for practice, will be facilitated. Additional resources will be given to session attendees.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Westmoreland East

2:00pm

Launching At-Risk Incoming Freshmen into Success
Summer Launch began in summer 2015 to better prepare at-risk, incoming freshmen for the rigors of college. 2 staff members and a faculty member banded together and created a one-week program utilizing upperclassmen mentoring and focusing on common problem areas such as reading comprehension, research methods, and dealing with failure.

This program will be delivered lecture-style with a presentation involving pictures, information, and data. I will also give the audience a worksheet to be able to translate the information given to their own campuses. We will work on it together throughout the session and lecture. I will also leave time at the end for questions and/or comments.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Allegheny Grand II

2:00pm

Building Beautiful Bridges: Training and Supporting International Tutors
Hiring international students as tutors is a beautiful thing. These tutors add diversity, unique perspectives, and energy to tutoring centers, thus enriching students’ learning experiences. But what challenges exist when hiring and training these tutors? This session will explore best practices for training and supporting this important tutor population.

This session is appropriate for any administrator, tutor coordinator/trainer, or other professional who works in a peer assistance program. The workshop will be divided into two interactive segments. The first half will focus on training international tutors, and the second half will focus on specific ways that staff can support international tutors while they are on the job. Attendees will have the opportunity to reflect and plot next steps. Likewise, each participant will receive a packet with handouts referenced in our presentation. The presenters will use a Prezi or a PowerPoint and will make that available to attendees, as well.

Speakers
BS

Brandi Schreiber

Brandi Willis Schreiber, M.A., is the Associate Director of Student Disability Services and the Program Director for the TECHniques Center at Texas Tech University. She is responsible for staff hiring and training, operations management, program development, fundraising and development... Read More →



Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Armstrong

2:00pm

Establishing a Successful Walk-in Tutoring Progam in Residence Halls/University Libraries
Carnegie Mellon University's Academic Development has managed to establish a successful walk-in tutoring program in three residence halls and two libraries on campus. Highly motivated and trained undergraduate Peer Tutors staff these sessions. This presentation will highlight the most successful elements of the program.

The Peer Tutor Program Coordinator will give a presentation on the history and development of Academic Development’s walk-in tutoring program with the aim of providing a model for other tutoring centers to follow. This will be proceeded by a panel discussion and q&a session between attendees and a group of Peer Tutors who help staff Academic Development’s walk-in tutoring service.

Moderators

Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Fayette

2:00pm

Leveraging Peer Leaders: Effectively use Students in Tutoring Center Management
This session will cover how to leverage the talented and driven students we all have on staff. The Student Program Coordinator model has been in use for over a decade and is a leadership development opportunity for the students as well as an effective and efficient learning center management strategy.

After brief introductions, the presenters will review the literature on benefits to peer leadership, specifically Shook & Keup as well as Kouzes & Posner. Then an overview of the Student Program Coordinator (SPC) will be offered. The bulk of the time will be spent guiding participants through construction of their own “blueprint for success”. For each design element of the “blueprint” the presenters will facilitate a discussion using best practice examples. Finally, each attendee will be asked to record an action step for when they return to their home campus. The presenters will use PowerPoint to provide visual support.

Presentation File via Google Drive

Moderators
Speakers


Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Cambria West

2:00pm

Retirement: The Bridge to Elderhood
As we move into retirement we are asked many questions about what we are going to do with the rest of our lives. In this discussion hopefully we can open our hearts and minds to changing the paradigm to becoming the Elder Sages that is our destiny.

This will be an open discussion with examples provided to stimulate thought and participation. Many examples will be provided in the handouts to help members get the message of elderhood loud and clear. The presenter has many years of experience at encouraging audience participation.

Moderators

Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Somerset West

2:00pm

Bridges to Each Other: 50 Years at the Water Cooler
For fifty years, CRLA has provided a valuable “water cooler” networking experience for reading and learning professionals. Using the principles of Personal Knowledge Management Systems; Seek, Sense, and Share, you can build an online professional network that functions like a “virtual water cooler,” and can provide inspiration and support 24/7.

Delivery will be through lecture and power point with guided note handouts for the audience members to take notes and begin considering how they can use the information in their own professional lives.



Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Westmoreland West

2:00pm

Bridging Experience to Facilitate Better Teaching: An IRW Mentoring Model
This session addresses a mentoring model developed for new IRW instructors. Research on mentees’ perceptions of the model will be presented alongside the structure of the model to give an idea of the model’s efficacy and how it was built.

The mentoring model will be described as well as the basis for its inception. Then, the research on mentees’ experiences will be explored, giving a picture of their perception of the model and its efficacy in assisting new IRW instructors. Audience members will be invited to share how IRW mentoring is implemented at their institutions and consider how our model might be adapted to suit their needs.


Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Pennsylvania East

2:00pm

Disciplinary Literacy: How do Experts and Novices Approach Literary Text
This study examined the discipline-specific strategies that experts and novices use to read and comprehend literary texts. Findings indicate differences between literary experts and student novices and unique differences between the strategies developmental and non-developmental students employ to read literary texts. These differences have pedagogical implications for DE literacy classes.

Research data will be presented and implications for practice will be discussed. This session will use discussion and question/answer activities to present to and to engage the audience. Thus, we will use our research data as a starting point for a larger group discussion on what it means for the field and for our classroom practices.

Moderators
JL

Jodi Lampi

Northern Illinois University,Academic Literacy andLearning

Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Pennsylvania West

3:15pm

Assessing Job Skills and Helping Students Build a Portfolio
Utilizing clearly established Professional Competencies and General Education Literacy standards can create a cohesive student experience across a degree program. Aligning assignments with specific competencies can help students prepare for their chosen career field and develop a portfolio for practical use post graduation.

The four presenters will each share their own connection with the program and development of PCs and GELs. Presenters will discuss research and best practices. The audience will be able to ask questions and join in the discussion. Audience members will also be asked to consider how points from the presentation might align with their own institution.



Friday November 3, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Cambria East

3:15pm

Elections Committee
Friday November 3, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Crawford East

3:15pm

“Prep for the Test”: Promoting Student Success through Proper Placement
“Prep for the Test” uses tools and strategies to build trust and model resource use between the college and students before they enroll in their first class while narrowing the gaps between institution, community, and student. Placing students in appropriate starting classes gives them confidence and increases potential for completion.

This workshop will be delivered through presentation including highlights on PowerPoint, interactive discussion, worksheets and activities, as well as a question-and-answer session.

Moderators

Friday November 3, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Lawrence

3:15pm

Bridging the Divide: Academic Support Across Student Populations
This presentation explores our journey in coordinating academic support services across traditional, adult, and graduate student populations. We offer recommendations for transcending barriers to student success and promoting inclusive opportunities for learning support and increased access to academic resources.

Through narrative, we will share how our level of engagement in our higher education affected our success and shapes our administrative approach to academic support. We will then ground our conversation in the mission and values of our institution, followed by an exploration of the trends in higher education in providing academic support for various student populations in the midst of budget and personnel constraints. Finally, we will share how we practically combine our services and address barriers in the process. We will then engage the audience in dialogue regarding their challenges in coordinating support services for different student populations.

Moderators
Speakers


Friday November 3, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Westmoreland East

3:15pm

No Typical Job: The Impact of Tutoring on the Tutor
Numbers and data speak! Come learn how tutoring positively effects the tutor, which can be used to justify your center’s work and more financial support from administration. Studies in the field only address the effects on the tutee, but understanding the impact on the tutor can help in numerous ways.

The presenter for this session will begin with the limited research available on the impact of tutoring (and tutor training) on the peer tutor. Using real data from a survey she created and distributed to current/former tutors across the U.S., this presenter will then address ways in which tutoring positively affects the peer tutor and thus, retention, graduation and employment rates for these students. The session will then devote time to videos of tutors’ testimonies about the impact tutoring had on them both currently and for their future goals. It will conclude with a discussion about attendees’ experiences.

Moderators

Friday November 3, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Butler West

3:15pm

Regression Analysis of Remedial Mathematics Students’ Success
The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of redesigned remedial coursework model on the student achievement rate of students enrolled in the gatekeeper mathematics course, between Academic Year (AY) 2012 - AY 2013, to attain an associate degree at the Technical College System of Georgia.

PowerPoint presentation will describe the motivation, objectives, methodology, results, summarization of findings, limitations, and recommendations of the study. The presenter will end the presentation by asking if the participants had any questions pertaining to the study and will then open up the discussion forum after all the questions have been answered.



Friday November 3, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Butler East

3:15pm

Metaphors and Storytelling in tutoring Pacific Island Students
Surveys with Pacific Island students suggest that certain pedagogical practices patterned after the US educational system are often incongruent with indigenous approaches to teaching and learning. Taking a comparative view of their US and Asian counterparts, this study focuses on the best practices for tutoring English to Pacific Islanders.

This presentation will be delivered through a powerpoint presentation and visual slides, videos, and discussion.

Moderators
Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Armstrong

3:15pm

Beating the Barrier! Student Support Services Tutoring the Barrier Courses
Through a comparative study of FG students tutored and FG students not tutored an understanding of the non-cognitive barriers impeding students was illuminated as well as an understanding of best practices when working with this population in relation to first generation college students taking barrier courses in math and science.

The session will be delivered through presentation format with the audience using at least one of the strategies for planning.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Westmoreland West

3:15pm

Supporting Multilingual Peer Tutors
This session will focus on best practices in supporting undergraduate peer tutors who speak English as a second language. The presentation will provide an overview of challenges faced by these multilingual peer tutors and will share training and support strategies developed for the peer tutoring program at [university name redacted].

Our 40-minute presentation will consist of three parts: an overview of the issues faced by peer tutors who are non-native English speakers and the relevant research; a description of the training and support strategies we’ve developed and put into practice; and an assessment of the efficacy of these support practices. The 20-minute audience interaction portion will include a small-group discussion followed by questions from the audience at large. This format will enable audience members to build bridges between the diversity of their own programs and come to a productive consensus on how to best support their own ESL tutors.


Friday November 3, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Washington

3:15pm

Bridge the Gap: A Meaningful Professional Development Opportunity
ATLAS is a yearlong faculty learning community targeting developmental reading adjunct faculty to help shift their pedagogy from a skills- to a holistic-based approach to college-level literacy. Additionally, adjunct perceptions of marginalization can be ameliorated by such professional development opportunities when they are executed and implemented with thought and care.

This session will be delivered by a PPT, where we explain the premise and model of a topics-based learning community, and why it is suitable to address the field of reading and learning. We will ground this all in research. We will conduct an interactive session so that participants are able to apply this to their institutional needs.

Moderators
Speakers


Friday November 3, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Somerset West

3:15pm

Building Bridges with Parents: Institutional Strategies for Student Success
Universities struggle with the extent to which parents should be involved in the college experience. While research suggests parents should back off, it also shows that students can be more successful with parental support. This session examines strategies allowing effective parental support, from a healthy distance.

This interactive presentation provides participants with a background in research on parental involvement in higher education. Participants will reflect on their current campus climate and parent interactions. Presenters address issues to consider in creating parent support opportunities, framing the discussion around the stakeholders: the student, the parent, and the institution. Participants will share their parent communication challenges and approaches, and their ideas for moving forward. Presenters will provide participants with potential resources that institutions can share with parents to eliminate mixed messages, help parents strike a balance between hovering and letting go, and contribute to student success.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Pennsylvania East

3:15pm

Online Academic Support Service: What are the Options - Johanna Dvorak

This is the ATP co-sponsored session.


Friday November 3, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Somerset East

3:15pm

Qualitative Research for Developmental Educators and Learning Assistance Professionals
Expanding a field of study such as postsecondary developmental education and learning assistance to include qualitative research approaches has several benefits for the individual and the field, particularly since these fields contain multiple, unique populations that demand contextual details to be at the forefront of questions being asking.


Moderators
JL

Jodi Lampi

Northern Illinois University,Academic Literacy andLearning

Speakers

Friday November 3, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Pennsylvania West

3:15pm

Tutors Without Borders: Expanding Tutoring Access with Web Conferencing
Participants will learn how in an environment of fixed resources and hard-to-reach students, one college with nine locations established a Skype tutoring program. Discussion will include the rationale, successes and challenges of designing, implementing and assessing a remote tutoring program.

The session will begin with participants making and discussing a wish list for a remote tutoring program. This will transition to a PowerPoint presentation with information about the priorities and design of the specific program. Next, the presenter will demonstrate, live, how the service is set-up, including how it interacts with TutorTrac; participants can ask technical questions during this time. Then, participants will participate in a model tutoring session. Finally, the presenter will speak about the successes and challenges of the program, including data. There will be time for questions and discussion of next steps at the conclusion.

Moderators
Friday November 3, 2017 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Cambria West

4:30pm

6:30pm

Andy Warhol Museum Tour
Ticket required. Space is limited to 29 people. Sign up using the conference registration process.  If space available, sign up at the registration table at the conference. Cost=$30

Itinerary:
6:15 pm Meet in the Westin Lobby
6:30 pm Bus departs from the Westin
6:45 pm Arrive at Andy Warhol Museum
9:00 pm Bus returns to Westin

The Andy Warhol Museum is one of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, and a collaborative project between the Carnegie Institute, the Dia Art Foundation, and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. Pittsburgh is Warhol’s birthplace, and the museum’s collection includes 900 paintings, 100 sculptures, 4,000 photographs, and more than 1,000 published and unique prints displayed in 17 exhibits throughout the museum’s seven floors. The museum holds the largest collection of Warhol’s artwork and archival materials, and it is one of the most comprehensive single-artist museums in the world and the largest in North America. The café and store will be open during the visit.

Friday November 3, 2017 6:30pm - 9:00pm
Andy Warhol Museum 117 Sandusky St, Pittsburgh, PA 15212

6:30pm

Phipps Conservatory Tour
Ticket required. Space is limited to 29 people. Sign up using the conference registration process. If space available, register at registration desk at the conference. Cost= $40

Itinerary:
6:15 pm Meet in the Westin Lobby
6:30 pm Bus departs from the Westin
6:45 pm Arrive at Phipps Conservatory – Free to eat dinner at café or explore Phipps
9:00 pm Bus returns to Westin

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens is a Pittsburgh gem — a thriving oasis with many unique environments to explore. Begin your journey in the LEED®-certified Welcome Center before entering the exquisite 1893 glasshouse with ever-changing displays. Then, continue on to the Tropical Forest Conservatory and the Center for Sustainable Landscapes, one of the greenest buildings on Earth. You can indulge your senses with breathtaking seasonal flower shows and exhibits; ground-breaking sustainable architecture; gorgeous outdoor gardens and green rooftops; and more. You will also be able to see a special exhibit before it closes: SUPER. NATURAL., created by Jason Gamrath, a master glass artist from Seattle. Jason Gamrath brings an exciting new twist to the art form, creating botanical pieces that are remarkably accurate representations of their living counterparts — only on a massive scale, standing anywhere from six to 14 feet tall. The show fills the Conservatory with more than 40 major installations, each of which was carefully selected for each room and location, and many of which were custom made for Phipps. Café Phipps offers a variety of dishes that awaken the senses with colorful presentations, complex aromas and fresh flavors. The café’s full menu is available until 7 pm with grab-and-go items available until 9 pm.

Friday November 3, 2017 6:30pm - 9:30pm
Phipps Conservatory 1 Schenley Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15213
 
Saturday, November 4
 

7:30am

Session Chairs' Orientation
Session Chairs introduce presenters and distribute and collect evaluation forms from session attendees. Session Chair Orientation is held each morning for assignments. Benefits include a guaranteed seat at the session you're chairing and an opportunity to serve the association while getting to know the presenters and CRLA colleagues.

Saturday November 4, 2017 7:30am - 8:00am
Lawrence

7:30am

Registration
Saturday November 4, 2017 7:30am - 10:00am
Allegheny Foyer

8:00am

Bridges to Academic Text: Pairing with Culturally Relevant Readings
Culturally relevant texts are powerful tools to both engage developmental college students and build bridges to academic text, when carefully paired. Theoretical and practical ideas accelerating reading growth and cultivating reading skills will be presented: specifically embedding cultural relevancy and pairing culturally relevant readings with academic texts.

A variety of modes will be employed. First, audience engagement will involve the use of Polleverywhere.com to create (through cell phone texts) a live survey of cultures/schools represented. Secondly, a lecture with graphs, pictures, and current examples of paired culturally relevant readings (including Hispanic and Hmong) and academic texts via PowerPoint. Also, the student learning outcomes and growth trajectory of students to date will be discussed. Models of activities, questions, and paired readings will be disseminated. Finally, small group sessions: participants will share the current cultures they are working with and recommendations of interesting readings for pairings will be generated.

Moderators

Saturday November 4, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Fayette

8:00am

Using texts that address contemporary issues in college writing courses
Texts that examine contemporary issues provide a backdrop for students to develop their writing skills beyond process and grammar. This session examines how texts in a first year writing course strengthened students’ writing and established a context for writing experiences. Findings suggest students’ writing, class participation, and faculty-student relationships improved.

This will be a short presentation followed by a discussion, using PowePoint and a projector. The audience will have an opportunity to examine the assessment results associated with the FYC courses, the survey instruments, and a sample of a reading used in the courses.

Moderators
Saturday November 4, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Armstrong

8:00am

Process Improvement: Process Mapping Your Learning Center's Work Flow
Academic Development has used student needs as the basis for programmatic innovation across all components. Through the introduction of a robust Academic Coaching, Peer Tutoring, and Supplemental Instruction/EXCEL Collaborative Learning Group Program, we have been building academic bridges for students for twenty years.

The presenters will give an overview of the journey Academic Development has traveled over the past twenty years, highlighting innovations in each of the programs in a panel format. The audience will have the opportunity to ask questions of the panelists, which will include student employees who work within each component as well as the department director and program coordinators.


Saturday November 4, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Somerset West

8:00am

Writing Tutor Training: A 1-Credit Course Model
As part of employee training, our Writing Consultants take a 1-credit Writing Consultant Training course, which was developed through collaboration between our Center and the English department. This presentation will discuss the course, its inception, and its impact on our writing tutors.

The session will be presented using PowerPoint or Google Slides. It will encourage discussion and feedback throughout the session and especially at the end.   

Moderators
Saturday November 4, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Lawrence

8:00am

Assessment of peer tutoring and mentoring on students' success
The Center for Learning Excellence (CLE) at AlAkhawayn University had a strategic impact on the increase of success and excellence at the level of freshmen courses in the department of science and engineering. We proved with 95% confidence that our services had a direct impact on students' grades.

We will use visual aid (power point presentation) and include clearly the numbers and graphs needed to fully understand the objectives of the presentation.
Handouts will also be distributed to facilitate the understanding of the statistical approach used. The audience will be engaged by starting with an Ice Breaking activity and questions to have the audiences' input

Moderators
Speakers

Saturday November 4, 2017 8:00am - 9:00am
Pennsylvania East

8:00am

Building Bridges: Forming Writing Center/Campus Partnerships to Assist Students
By strengthening relationships with faculty and staff, the SHU Writing Center has expanded its services to create and implement initiatives. New types of workshops and strategies targeting specific student populations will be discussed. Participants will be guided through steps to take to become the architects of their own cross-campus collaborations.

The presenters will explain the background for collaborations, as well as their process for developing, implementing and revising the activities stemming from their partnerships. Specific strategies will be shared, as well as the resulting impact from these initiatives. Video testimonials from colleagues involved will also be shown. In addition to sharing their experiences, presenters will guide participants through steps so they can begin exploring outreach on their own campuses: recognizing concerns, identifying possible collaborators, determining a process, implementing initiatives, considering revisions, and evaluating new projects. Participants will share their ideas during the workshop.

Moderators
Speakers

Saturday November 4, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Westmoreland East

8:00am

Efficient & Effective Readers: Bridging Success Counseling and Literacy Support
Interested in helping students integrate reading and study strategies into their reading process? Curious about exploring the intersection between student success counseling and literacy support? Join Meaghan and Renee in this interactive workshop where you will learn and practice strategies that you can implement immediately with your students.

This workshop will be implemented as a model for how this content can best be delivered to college students. More specifically, the workshop will include facilitated discussion of participants’ needs in supporting their students, direct instruction, application of the strategies and skills, and metacognitive discussion about implications on participants’ professional practice. Participants will leave with not only the foundational knowledge of how to link time management techniques and strategic reading skills, but also the tools and materials necessary for sharing this approach with their students immediately.

Moderators
Speakers

Saturday November 4, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Cambria East

8:00am

Integrated Course Design: Connecting Students to Their Potential as Learners
Using Fink's (2013) Taxonomy for significant learning and integrated course design as a framework when structuring courses fosters deep connections between students and the course material, their potential as learners, and ultimately the overall experience of learning. This workshop will engage participants in creating the foundation for transformative learning.

Attendees will be introduced to Fink's (2013) Taxonomy for significant learning and integrated course design through a mini-lecture. The presenter's course syllabus will be used as an example. They will then write 1-2 of their own learning outcomes for a course they facilitate using Fink's Taxonomy. Next, there will be mini-lecture on the differences between active learning and assessment activities, as well as auditive versus educative assessment activities. Participants will work in groups to complete short case studies and then will use Fink's (2013) Integrated course design chart to match their learning outcomes with active learning and assessment activities.

Moderators
Saturday November 4, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Washington

8:00am

Developing 21st Century skills in students using a competency-based approach
In this interactive workshop, participants will explore the benefits of applying a competency-based approach to help student-staff develop 21st Century skills. Opportunities are designed to enhance vocational self-efficacy and provide practical experience to support future career interests. Participants will have the opportunity to design competencies for their programs.

In this session, we will use a mix of delivery methods including presentation, small and large group discussion, and individual and small group work. Participants will be introduced to background, literature, and rationale for this session topic, see various examples from our institution, share with and learn from other participants, and have an opportunity to develop and design their own examples of competency-based professional development activities for their tutors, SI leaders, or other staff.



Saturday November 4, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Somerset East

8:00am

Synergistic Supervision: Building Strategies for Managing a Large Student Staff
Student staff retention is an important part of managing a successful program. However, many Coordinators oversee multiple programs and many student employees with limited resources. This workshop will explore how supervisors can utilize various tools and techniques in order to manage time efficiently, while providing an enriching employment experience.

This workshop will begin with participants sharing challenges they encounter while managing a large staff or multiple programs.
The presenter will discuss the importance of staff retention, introduce the framework of synergistic supervision, and identify five common challenges faced by LAC supervisors.

Participants will break out into five groups to collect and present their own strategies and innovations that help them address each challenge, and the presenter will introduce additional approaches and tools that have proven to be effective.
Strategies and tools will be collected and posted in the “Toolbox,” located on an accessible Google Site.

Moderators

Saturday November 4, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Westmoreland West

8:00am

Building Bridges, Removing Barriers: Supporting Students with Disabilities
This panel will address issues of understanding diversity and leveraging student differences to maximize success for students with disabilities. Key points will focus on faculty-student connections as well as an in-depth examination of disabilities. Audience members will be actively engaged in this dynamic conversation about working with students with disabilities.




Saturday November 4, 2017 8:00am - 9:30am
Butler East

9:45am

12:30pm

Fallingwater Tour
Ticket required. Space is limited to 29 people. Sign up using the conference registration process. If space available, sign up at the registration desk at the conference. Cost=$46

Itinerary:
12:15 pm Meet in the Westin Lobby
12:30 pm Bus departs from the Westin
2:00 pm Bus arrives at Fallingwater
4:30 pm Bus departs Fallingwater
6:00pm Bus returns to the Westin

Fallingwater is a house built between 1936 and 1939 over a waterfall in southwest Pennsylvania by Frank Lloyd Wright, America’s most famous architect. It was designed and built for the Kaufmann family, owners of the upscale Pittsburgh Department store Kaufmann’s. Fallingwater is recognized today as arguably Frank Lloyd Wright's finest work. Edgar Kaufmann Jr., son of the house's patron, entrusted Fallingwater and land around it to the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy in 1963. It was featured on the cover of Time magazine in January 1938, and it is the only major Wright-designed house open to the public with its furnishings, artwork and setting intact.

The group will tour the house and have time to stroll the grounds. The tour includes a considerable amount of walking and be prepared for the weather as about half the tour is outside.

Saturday November 4, 2017 12:30pm - 6:00pm
Fallingwater 1491 Mill Run Rd, Mill Run, PA 15464